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Fuchs Mizrachi School curriculum - grades 1 - 5

LOWER SCHOOL
CURRICULUM HANDBOOK


FUCHS MIZRACHI SCHOOL
2301 Fenwick Road
University Heights, OH 44118
(216)-932-0220
www.fuchsmizrachi.org


FIRST EDITION
5762/ 2001-2

Table of Contents
Fuchs Mizrachi School Statement of Philosophy
3
Introduction 4
Selections from Reviews of Our Curriculum 5
Some Key Elements of Our Practice 6
Homework in the Lower School 7
An Introduction to Assessment 8
Torah Studies Curriculum 10
Chumash 11
Kindergarten 11
Grade One 12
Grade Two 13
Grade Three 20
Grade Four 26
Grade Five 32
Parsha Primer Sample 34
Dinim 36
Grade One 36
Grade Two 37
Grade Three 38
Grade Four 39
Grade Five 40
Mishna 53
Tefilla 60
Ivrit 62 Kindergarten 62
Grade One 63
Grade Two 64
Grade Three 65
Grade Four 66
Grade Five 67
Key Root Words 68
Key Words 69
General Studies Curriculum 72
Fine Arts 73
Kindergarten 73
Grade One 74
Grade Two 75
Grade Three 76
Grade Four 77
Grade Five 78
Language Arts 79
Kindergarten 79
Grade One 80
Grade Two 81
Grade Three 85
Grade Four 87
Grade Five 89
Math 91
Kindergarten 91
Grade One 92
Grade Two 93
Grade Three 94
Grade Four 95
Grade Five 96
Physical Education 97
Science 98
Kindergarten 98
Grade One 99
Grade Two 102
Grade Three 105
Grade Four 107
Grade Five 110
Social Studies 111
Grade One 111
Grade Two 114
Grade Three 118
Grade Four 125
Grade Five 129
Social Skills 135
Study Skills 137
F.M.S. Lower School Report Card 138
Fuchs Mizrachi School
Statement of Philosophy

Fuchs Mizrachi School is an Orthodox Jewish college preparatory day school offering educational programs for preschool though twelfth grade. The school seeks to foster allegiance to God's Torah, both written and oral, and its precepts, as interpreted by our sages. Our school identifies with the ideology of religious Zionism and seeks to foster love of the land of Israel.

We are committed to intellectual mastery of Torah and the natural sciences and secular disciplines, as part of the halachic imperative (Jewish law). We seek to produce a wholesome synthesis of the two within an intensive Torah atmosphere. In pursuit of these ideals we offer a sequential program of religious studies, taught in modern Hebrew (Ivrit b'Ivrit), in conjunction with a full range of college preparatory programming, including physical education, creative arts, and computer competency.

The school is committed to the unity of the Jewish people, the inculcation of ethical standards and the belief in the dignity of every human being. Of paramount importance is the teaching of values inherent in Torah-based moral practice. A Fuchs Mizrachi School education strives to enable each student to achieve the love of God and humankind, and be imbued with the joy found in these relationships.

A fundamental feature of the school is its commitment to a holistic approach to each child as a unique individual. Each child is encouraged to reach his or her full potential. The classroom is envisioned as a place where the children not only learn, but learn to enjoy learning, where the student's self-esteem is enhanced, and where creative thinking and divergent discussion are encouraged and able to flourish.


Introduction

“Give thanks to Hashem for He is good. His goodness endures forever.”

With thanks to Hashem for the privilege of serving His People, and especially His children, it is a pleasure to present this first edition of Fuchs Mizrachi School’s Lower School Curriculum Guide.

This Kindergarten through Fifth Grade curriculum has been designed to help teachers to provide our students with an outstanding education in both Torah and General Studies. It is based on what we view as best practices in education. It is the result of an entire school year worth of team effort on the part of our curriculum committee. Mrs. Marsha Goldstein, Mrs. Molly Perry, Mrs. Mila Schwam and Mrs. Jeanne Senn all worked with me to create a curriculum that we hope will set the standard for day school education in America. Mrs. Lesley Schweresenski, FMS’ Early Child Coordinator, worked on the Kindergarten segments of this curriculum. Mrs. Tami Goldberg worked on much of the Hebrew Language section of the curriculum. Mrs. Abby Labovits, our school counselor, contributed tremendously to the Social Skills section. Mrs. Polly Wilkenfeld, Mrs. Sue Kane and Mrs. Barbara Zober- as well as Rabbi Pinchos Hecht, our Head of School- provided invaluable assistance to this effort. We were also enriched by the consulting work of Professor Aryeh Wohl (Open University of Tel Aviv and Mat”ach) in the area of Hebrew language and literacy development and Professor Nancy Barbour (Kent State University) in the area of early childhood education.

I want to thank Rabbi Melvin Granestein t"yhka (Rabbi, Green Road Synagogue), Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz (Director of Curriculum Resources, Jewish Education Center of Cleveland) Ms. Barbara Freedman (teacher and curriculum developer, Hebrew Academy of Montreal) and Esther Lapian (Mount Scopus College, Australia) for volunteering their expert review. Their advice assisted us in making this a far better curriculum. Selected comments from these reviews follow. We are deeply grateful.

Special thanks to Dr. Grant Wiggins of re:Learning by Design for reviewing the article on assessment, as well as our report card. His work on assessment and curricular planning deeply influenced this project.

We also wish to recognize the role of the work of Professor Heidi Hayes Jacobs’ work on curriculum mapping, as well as the some of the research in the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development’s monumental Curriculum Handbook, in helping us develop a framework for our curriculum development.

Curriculum is an on-going process. The reader will note that some of our units are more developed than others. It is also clear that we must continue to develop and evolve our program to continue to provide the very best education to our children. We certainly hope that there will be many more editions of this curriculum.

It is our hope and prayer that Hashem will guide us as educators to help our children learn the lessons of our Torah and of our world.
Rabbi Shmuel Jablon
Head of Lower School
Iyyar, 5761…April, 2001
Selections from Reviews of Our Curriculum

“I liked it. It is very good. It’s educationally sensitive and sufficiently detailed. It has a clear philosophical base, which is extremely vital. It has a clear perspective that is Torani and Tzioni. Obviously, everything depends on the implementation.”

Rabbi Melvin Granatstein (Rabbi, Green Road Synagogue, Cleveland)

“When well-written, a curriculum document offers a school educational and Judaic coherence that deeply enriches the learning experiences of each individual child. Learning consciously builds: one unit upon the next, one year upon the next, one discipline upon the other. A well-written curriculum offers guidance, but leaves room for teachers' personal interests, strengths, and teaching styles.

Y'shar ko-ach to Rabbi Jablon and the Fuchs Mizrachi School Lower School faculty for an incredibly well-conceived and well-written document. Most impressive is obvious attention to research that supports the need for education that is built upon key understandings, that differentiates instruction for students, that is integrated where appropriate, that is
consciously spiraled from year to year, that assesses students in authentic forums, and that opens conversation among teachers. You've done it all! The beneficiaries will most undoubtedly be your students . . . our Jewish future. “

Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz (Director of Curriculum Resources, Jewish Education Center of Cleveland)

“Overall, I was very impressed, especially with the integration (e.g. study of Israel in English), which I'd like to see happen in my school as well.”

Barbara Freedman (Hebrew Academy of Montreal)

“After reading the content of this well written curriculum I must say that the approach and material contained reflects much thought and balanced thinking. The development of each subject looks good and offers strong support to any teaching staff that desires to fulfill its duties as educators.
The content is crisp, current and well-balanced. One can only hope that the actualization of the curriculum will reach its desired goals of producing a solid, strong Torah person who will be able to meet the challenges of the world and maintain a very close, warm and positive relationship with all
of Am Yisrael. Kol hakavod.”

Dr. Aryeh Wohl (Education Director, Center for Educational Technology- Mata”ch; Chair, Department of Humanities, Talpiot Teachers College; Head of Team and Senior Editor of courses in Literacy-Language Arts, Open University of Tel Aviv)
“The report card looks good - clean, compact, thorough…”

Dr. Grant Wiggins (President, re: Learning by Design and noted author)

Some Key Elements of Our Practices:

What we believe about every child…

• Every child in our school has the ability to identify with pride AND knowledge as an Observant Jew. Part of this is a strong identification with the People and State of Israel. Every child has the ability to strive to be a Ben or Bat Torah, and to strive to sanctify Hashem’s Name in all that s/he does.
• Every child is unique and learns differently. We strive to help every child to learn and grow in multiple ways.
• Children have, and need, a variety of ways to express themselves. These include written, oral, artistic, musical and multi-media expressions.
• Children learn to make intelligent decisions in a democratic society by having opportunities for democracy in school. This includes making individual decisions about what to do when (such as selecting learning centers) and participating in group decision making.
• We work to create a child centered environment. We hope that children will love being a part of the class and school community.

What we believe about the learning process…
• Torah Studies represent far more than just a subject. They represent a way of life. We seek for our children to live a life of mitzvot- both between man and G-d and man and man.
• Children begin to excel in Torah and Hebrew studies when they are immersed in a Hebrew environment. We recognized that the extent of immersion may need to be differentiated depending on students’ skills and aptitude.
• Reading and writing are core skills in all areas of school (and life).
• Learning math is more than just memorizing “math facts.” It is about applying math skills to real life problem solving. This is accomplished differently at different developmental levels.
• The study of science should be both “hands on” and “minds on.” Students must learn to make hypotheses and test them, as well as to observe the natural order of creation.
• Cooperative learning not only assists students in developing social skills, it helps students to learn to work together in teams to succeed. This is a vital skill in the modern workplace.
• In any school, many students are at different skill levels, and all are within normal developmental range. As such, we strive to meet the needs and to provide exciting challenges for all children at all levels. First grade is a time when there is a particularly wide range of development and abilities. As such, while some children enter the class reading and writing, other children will need all year to feel comfortable with these skills. In second grade, most students are quite comfortable reading and understanding both English and Hebrew. Third graders are able to begin learning to be B’nai and B’not Torah. Students are fluent readers, and are encouraged to select books and topics of personal interest. By fourth grade, students aren’t only learning to read; they are reading to learn. They have the opportunities to select challenging books that interest them, as well to write about topics that engage them. By fifth grade, students are expected to be able to read and analyze information and to communicate their ideas clearly and creatively. They are also learning to evaluate various sources of information as well as the ideas and products of others.
• As all children are different, we support differentiated instruction. We seek to provide enrichment, where warranted, that deepens children’s understanding and skills. We are willing to modify requirements, when needed, for individuals while still insuring the overall progress of the class as a whole.

What we believe about curriculum…
• Wherever possible, we seek to integrate between academic disciplines.
• We strongly recommend using authentic assessment in order to determine students’ progress (An introductory article and resource list follow.).
• Social skills and study skills are both vital parts of any learning experience. As such, they cannot be left to chance, but must be part of the planned curriculum.
• Curriculum must constantly evolve to make sure that we are consistent with “best practices.”

Homework in the Lower School:

We hope that all of our children will not just love school, but that they will love learning! Our curriculum, under constant review, is designed to be engaging and challenging in every way. An important part of this is homework. Homework is never intended to be "busy work" or "drill and kill." It is intended either to reinforce what the children have learned in school or to help them prepare for a future lesson or project.

All of our children, beginning in grade one, should expect to do homework nightly. A particular focus on our homework is reading. In the Lower School, homework (which includes reading and/or written work in both Judaic and General Studies) should take no more than the following length of time.

1st Grade- 15 minutes
2nd Grade- 20-30 minutes
3rd Grade- 30-45 minutes
4th Grade- 45-60 minutes
5th Grade- 45-60 minutes
Students will often be assigned long term projects. It is important that they budget their time properly so that they will be within the homework guidelines above. Teachers and parents can work together to help our students learn this important skill.

Parents may decide when their child has exceeded the limits and write a note to excuse him/her from the work not completed. Parents are asked that if their child regularly has trouble with homework to arrange to speak with the teacher as soon as possible.

(adapted from the Fuchs Mizrachi School Student-Parent Handbook)



An Introduction to Assessment

"Assessment should be deliberately designed to improve and educate student performance, not merely to audit it as most school tests currently do."
....................................- Dr. Grant Wiggins, preface to Educative Assessment
Outstanding educators are learning the importance of honoring the the principles of "authentic assessment." This requires us to focus both on approximating authentic "real world" tasks in the subject(s) under study and on higher order thinking skills, all while using assessment as a means for continual student improvement (as opposed to auditing). This gives the student not only a better learning experience, but increases the chances that what they have learned will be of use to them beyond their current classroom. "Traditional" assessment tools are often not helpful in helping students to improve, to understand and to synthesize what they have learned. More authentic assessment, which uses a variety of tools (though clearly de-emphasizes objective tests of memorization) better helps us to help our students. Key elements of this method follow.

Assessment is a vital part of the learning process. It is designed not only for teachers to "grade" students, it is meant to help students to continually learn and improve.

Forms of assessment should approximate (on an age appropriate level) work that is done in the "real world" in that subject (i.e. be authentic tasks of intellectual performance). Thus, while objective quizzes and tests will occasionally be necessary to judge a student's command of essential facts and discrete skills, the focus must be on having the students improve in their ability to "do" the subject under study. Students must be able not only to memorize details (even when they are important), they must know how to apply what they have learned to complex problems...and in their later personal and professional lives. They must learn to think critically and communicate their considered ideas (not simply repeat those of others). Therefore, research, experiments, oral and written presentations, educated debates and policy statements, peer teaching and review, and other forms of performance related assessment are key in the education of our students. Though objective quizzes and tests cannot be entirely eliminated, they should be minimized as they tend to examine those things that are really not very important to us. To use Dr. Wiggins’ terms noted above, they are "audits" rather than methods of improving student performance.

• We encourage cooperative learning projects, particularly those calling for both individual and group accountability. Working together is not cheating; it is how successful people do things in the "real world." Replicating this in the classroom could involve experiments conducted by lab partners, conducting a mock trial, producing a newspaper, writing and performing a dramatic production, writing a business plan, working together to build a model or design a mural, creating a school-wide post office, or a host of other group projects. Even a work sheet (normally not used to encourage high level thinking) done in pairs teaches the value of working together to achieve a greater goal. However, in assessment we must be careful to distinguish between what the group has accomplished and what individuals have contributed.
• Since rote memorization of details is of questionable value, tests and essays should often be "open book" and "often notes." After all, most adult tasks are "open book." We use our skills to analyze and synthesize information. Memory should only be tested when memorization of something is a worthy objective (which would seem to be not often).
• The goals and expectations, as well as basis for grading, must be clear to students from the beginning of the project. This is essential not only to optimize learning, but it is also unethical to penalize students for failing to do what they didn't realize was required. Current educational scholarship strongly suggests the use of rubrics (rating scales) for both communicating expectations and grading everyone fairly.
• On-going feedback (not solely at the end of a project or test) from the teacher is essential to the learning process. Feedback is neither praise nor blame (This is motivation, which is also essential in education.). It is a report of what one did or did not do in relation to what was expected. The closer to the task this feedback is given, the more the student will learn from the experience.
• Teachers are encouraged to make individual accommodations and program modifications for students with special learning challenges (The report card should reflect "modified program."). Assessment is more authentic when it is appropriate for the individual student being assessed. Still, the pace of the class should continue at its normal rate.
• When we are assessing for skill performance, attention should be paid to making sure that there have been ample opportunities for practice.
• Planning should be clear and done well in advance. In planning coherent units of study, Drs. Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe (authors of Understanding by Design and other works on assessment reform) argue for a concept known as "backward design." Rather than first planning the exciting activities we want to do in class, and then trying to fit in objectives and evaluation standards, we have to plan with the results in mind. What do we want students to understand? What is worth understanding? Having established the desired results, we must then ask: what will count as evidence of such learning?

In order to plan in this way, we must first establish priorities. Drs. Wiggins and McTighe suggest looking at three circles. The widest circle contains that material "that is worth being familiar with." In the middle is a circle of items "important to know and do." The smallest circle contains "enduring understandings," the big ideas that are important to remember forever. Educators then need to determine what is acceptable evidence of having mastered the items in the circles from step one. Once we know how we will assess students, we can then (and only then) plan appropriate learning activities to insure students will fulfill our expectations. It is vital that as we progress in any area of study, that we move beyond simple facts and skills to important concepts and ideas. Both teacher and student should always be able to answer, "So what? Why is this important?"

This is only a summary of a crucial topic. Please consider exploring these resources.:
Educational Testing Service and re: Learning by Design, Assessment Wizzard CD-Rom
Dr. Lynn Erickson, Concept Based Curriculum and Instruction (Corwin Press)
Dr. Jay McTighe and Dr. Grant Wiggins, Understanding by Design (ASCD)
Dr. Jay McTighe and Dr. Grant Wiggins, Understanding by Design-Handbook (ASCD)
Dr. Jay McTighe and Dr. Grant Wiggins, Understanding by Design-Video Series(ASCD)
Dr. Grant Wiggins, Assessing Student Performance (Jossey-Bass)
Dr. Grant Wiggins, Educative Assessment (Jossey-Bass)
ubd.ascd.org (the web site for Understanding by Design)
www.relearning.org (the web site for re:Learning by Design, formerly CLASS, filled with great resources)
Special thanks to Dr. Grant Wiggins of re:Learning by Design for reviewing and commenting on this article.


TORAH STUDIES
“The study of Torah is equal to all other mitzvot!”
___________Mishna Pe’ah

Kindergarten Chumash

Summary: In Gan, we want students to become even more excited about Torah. They are exposed to the stories of the weekly Parsha.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy


Resources: Regular visits from the Rabbior teachers:Chumash (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)The Little Midrash SaysMy First Parsha Reader (Bnay Yakov Publications)D’vash u’Chalav (Jewish Agency- Dr. Aryeh Wohl)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.torahtots.com/parsha.htm

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem gave the Torah to the Jewish People.2) We love the Torah.

Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE: Students will know some of the key narratives in the weekly Parsha.SKILLS:1) Students will learn to how to respectfully handle a Chumash. 2) Students who have mastered the Hebrew alphabet will be able to recognize letters in a Chumash.

ASSESSMENT:observation of students

First Grade Chumash

BEGINNINGS
Summary: In Kittah Alef, the primary goal is for students to learn to read, write and speak Hebrew. This is the key (among other things) to future success in Torah Studies. As such, more time is spent on this than on Parshat haShavuah or beginning Chumash. However, all are part of the program.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Tal Am materialsBeresheet 1-2:3 (blown up large)

Resources: for students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)The Little Midrash SaysWhy the Moon Only GlowsTorah l’Tashbar series (Sukkath David)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.torahtots.com/parsha.htm

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem gave the Torah to the Jewish People.2) We love the Torah.3) Reading and understanding Hebrew is a key to understanding the Torah.4) Hashem made the world, and we have a responsibility to take good care of it.5) Hashem gave us a wonderful present- Shabbat.

Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will learn stories from Parshat haShavuah. They will always know the name and a theme from the Parsha.2) Students will learn the Creation Story.SKILLS:1) Students will be able to read vocalized Hebrew. Thus, students will be able to fluently (90% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text of Beresheet 1-2:3. 2) Students will be able to make Friday night Kiddush.3) Students will be able to list every Book of the Torah.4) Students will be able to identify which pasuk is being read, its start point and its ending.5) Students will learn to how to respectfully handle a Chumash.

ASSESSMENTS:oral reading from the Chumashlearning center projects on the days of CreationParsha art projects

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) On a weekly basis, we study Parshat haShavuah. This should always involve a story, a discussion and some artistic or musical opportunity.2) After Pesach, the Chumash is introduced. This is to begin the process of learning Chumash (finding a pasuk, reading, etc.) and to learn the Creation story.
Second Grade Chumash
1st Trimester
PARSHAT LECH LECHA: Avraham Our Father
Summary: Students will study Parshat Lech Lecha, focusing on the unique role of Avraham the Father, in-depth. There is a focus on the role of Eretz Yisrael. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based. The unit concludes with a Chumash Celebration where students receive their first standard Chumash, perform skits and deliver Divrei Torah.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Beresheet Lech Lecha Workbook (Reshef Publishing)
Weekly Time About 5.75 hours
Resources: for students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)Lord Jakobovits in Conversation, pp. 77-8 and 139-140 (London and Portland: Vallentine Mitchell, 2000)Torah l’Tashbar series (Sukkath David)List of key root words (p. 68 of this curriculum)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Ma'Aseh Avot Siman l'Banim- the Patriarchs and Matriarchs set the pattern for Jewish life.2) Avraham's actions give a preview of our later settling of the Land of Israel.3) Hashem's brit (coventant) with the Jewish People is eternal.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) How does Avraham show great faith in Hashem?2) Why does Avraham listen to Hashem?3) Why do you think Hashem didn't tell Avraham where he was going?4) Why is the Land of Israel so important to the Jewish People?5) How do Avraham's actions mirror future actions of the Jewish People?6) How can we "be a blessing" to the world?7) What is the content and nature of the brit (convenant) between Hashem and Avraham?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of this Torah Portion.2) Students will be able to identify key places of Israeli geography on a map.3) Students will know key Hebrew root words (See page 68 of this curriculum.).4) Students will be able to define brit milah (ritual circumcision).5) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text (particularly focusing on chapters 12, 13 and 16). Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses (selected from chapters 12, 13 and 16). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 12 verses 1-7, chapter 13 verses 14-18, chapter 16 verses 1, 4-5, 9-10,12, and 15. This is a vital skill as they develop their textual fluency.3) Students will be able to find a book, portion, chapter and verse in the Chumash.

ASSESSMENTS:
Performance Prompt I Can Be Like Avraham and Sarah
Students are asked, in small groups, to prepare skits regarding the story line of Parshat Lech Lecha. Skits should surround: 1) Hashem's command to leave his home; 2) Avraham and Sarah's initial settling in Israel; 3) Avraham saving Lot; 4) the Brit Ben haBetarim- the "Covenant Between the Parts" (between Hashem and Avraham that his children through Sarah will inherit the Land of Israel); 5) a modern day Israeli setting up a settlement. These may be performed at the Chumash Celebration Siyyum.
Performance Prompt Divrei Torah
Students are asked to deliver a D’var Torah at the Chumash Celebration Siyyum. This is a differentiated assignment. Some students will be able to read something they have learned. Some will be able to explain a concept related to the Enduring Understandings above. Still others will be able to give the D’var Torah in Hebrew.
Selected Response/Short-answer test/quiz Israeli geography
1) Students are asked to identify Israel on a map of the Middle East and on a globe.2) Students are given a blank map of Israel and asked to identify: Jerusalem, Ber Sheva, Bet El and Hevron.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses from Parshat Lech Lecha (from chapters 12, 13 or 16). These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Product check The Verse Hunt
The teacher will ask students to find a verse in their Chumash (for example, "Find Beresheet Chapter 12 verse 2") and read or copy (depending on size of class) the verse. This is intended to check their ability to look up verses when asked.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain to the students that we are going to see the foundation of the Jewish People. We are going to learn about our ancestors and about our Land.2) The teacher should introduce the concept of Ma'aseh Avot Siman L'Bamin--the Deeds of our Ancestors give a hint to the Jewish future. (This can be done by asking children to find out from the parents what they were like when they were children. What things did they do that might hint at what their children would do? What things were their parents interested in that they are also interested in? Now imagine doing this for the entire Nation of Israel!).3) The teacher should show the children Israel on a map. S/he should also show the cities of Yerushalayim, Bet El, Hevron and Ber Sheva and indicate that all of these will be important as we continue our studies.4) The teacher should tell the children that we are going to meet Avraham and Sarah- the first Father and Mother of the Jewish People.5) At this point, we are ready to begin Beresheet (Genesis) Chapter 12. Use this as a tool to show students how to find a Parsha, a Perek (chapter) and a Pasuk (verse). This can be constantly evaluated through the "verse hunt" exercise.6) The Parsha is studied chapter by chapter. The teacher sets the conceptual framework, relating to the key understandings and questions, before beginning the chapter. It is crucial to continue to stress the eternal nature of the brit, and that part of this brit is the Land of Israel!7) Once the chapter is introduced, the text is studied verse by verse in chapters 12, 13 and 16 and in an overview format for the other chapters. Ideally, this is done in Hebrew.8) Verses are differentiated based on the ability of the individual children. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 12 verses 1-7, chapter 13 verses 14-18, chapter 16 verses 1, 4-5, 9-10,12, and 15.9) Verses are studied and reviewed in small groups. This allows the teacher to differentiate as appropriate. Be sure to use the map of Israel when discussing geography!10) Short class discussions take place every other day to reinforce content and to begin discussing the key questions. Please remember that we want students to have both the "big ideas" of the essential understandings as well as to begin to develop textual fluency.11) Verses and story line are reviewed (in Hebrew) using the Reshef workbook series and short answer questions from the teacher.12) Chapters are reviewed for story line in class using short essays and discussion questions. Reading is reviewed using reading comprehension quizzes.13) The Parsha is evaluated with the "I Can Be Avraham and Sarah" prompts, geography quiz and a differentiated quiz on reading and explaining verses.14) CHUMASH CELEBRATION: In order to make the transition from the “beginner’s Chumash” used for Lech Lecha and the “standard” Chumash to be used for the rest of Beresheet, it is suggested to have a Chumash Celebration. Students should make a siyyum on Lech Lecha, performing the drama prompts above, as well as having the opportunity to give Divrei Torah. Students should receive their first standard Chumash. Naturally, singing and snacks should be part of the program. 14) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.



Second Grade Chumash
2nd Trimester
PARSHAT VAYERA: Avraham The Believer
Summary: Students will study Parshat Vayera, focusing on the unique role of Avraham the Father as the ultimate Believer in Hashem. Particular attention is paid to the “tests” of his faith. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Beresheet Vayera Workbook (Reshef Publishing)
Weekly Time:Resources: About 5.75 hoursfor students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)Torah l’Tashbar series (Sukkath David)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Avraham is the Father of belief in one G-d.2) Hashem (G-d) gave the Land of Israel to the Jewish People.3) Being in G-d’s Image means to try to emulate Hashem’s ways of Kindness.4) Ma'Aseh Avot Siman l'Banim- the Patriarchs and Matriarchs set the pattern for Jewish life.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why does Avraham believe so strongly in Hashem? How does he show this belief?2) Why was Avraham so anxious for guests?3) What does the story of the angels visiting Avraham teach us about being “in G-d’s Image”?4) Why did Hashem want to destroy Sedom? Should Avraham have argued?5) Who did the Akeyda test?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of this Torah Portion.2) Students will review key places of Israeli geography on a map.3) Students will know key Hebrew root words (see p. 68 of this curriculum).4) Students will be able to define hachnassat orchim and bikkur cholim.5) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text- particularly focusing on chapters 18, 19, 21 (verses 1-6) and 22. Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses (selected from chapters 18, 19, 21 (verses 1-6 and 22). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 18 verses 1-5 and 23-24, 32; chapter 21 verses 1-4; chapter 22 verses 1-3, 9-12.This is a vital skill as they develop their textual fluency.3) Review: Students will be able to find a book, portion, chapter and verse in the Chumash.

ASSESSMENTS:
Performance Prompt I Can Be Like Avraham and Sarah
Students are asked, in small groups, to prepare skits regarding the story line of Parshat Vayera. Skits should surround: 1) the angels visiting Avraham; 2) the birth of Yitzchak; 3) Akeydat Yitzchak; 4) students setting up a Hachnassat Orchim Committee
Performance Task: The Class Chesed Committee Students are asked to develop, in a class meeting, a Class Chesed Committee. They should discuss: 1) Why this might be a good thing to do. 2) What is the Torah-proof that this is how we should conduct ourselves? 3) How they, as second graders, can do Hachnassat Orchim and Bikkur Cholim. 4) What tasks individuals will do. 5) How they might communicate this to the rest of the Lower School (and thus encourage other classes to form their own committees). 6) How they will report to the rest of the class.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses from Parshat Vayera (from chapters 18, 19, 20 (verses 1-6) and 21). These verses should have already been taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Product check The Verse Hunt
The teacher will ask students to find a verse in their Chumash (for example, "Find Beresheet Chapter 18 verse 3") and read or copy (depending on size of class) the verse. This is intended to check their ability to look up verses when asked.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should tell the students that we are starting a new Parsha, one that will show us how Avraham is a model of incredible emunah (faith) in Hashem.2) The teacher reviews the concept of Ma’aseh Avot Siman l’Banim as well as basic Israeli geography. S/he points out that our story continues in Hevron (and why this is important).3) Teach the concepts of Bikkur Cholim and Hachnassat Orchim. Note that they will be very important at the beginning of the Parsha.4) At this point, we are ready to begin Beresheet (Genesis) Chapter 18. 5) The Parsha is studied chapter by chapter. The teacher sets the conceptual framework, relating to the key understandings and questions, before beginning the chapter.6) Once the chapter is introduced, the text is studied verse by verse in chapters 18, 19, 20 (verses 1-6) and 21and in an overview format for the other chapters. Ideally, this is done in Hebrew.7) Verses are differentiated based on the ability of the individual children. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 18 verses 1-5 and 23-24, 32; chapter 21 verses 1-4; chapter 22 verses 1-3, 9-12.8) Verses are studied and reviewed in small groups. This allows the teacher to differentiate as appropriate. Be sure to use the map of Israel when discussing geography!9) Short class discussions take place every other day to reinforce content and to begin discussing the key questions. Please remember that we want students to have both the "big ideas" of the essential understandings as well as to begin to develop textual fluency.10) Verses and story line are reviewed (in Hebrew) using the Reshef workbook series and short answer questions from the teacher.11) Chapters are reviewed for story line in class using short essays and discussion questions. Reading is reviewed using reading comprehension quizzes.12) The Parsha is summarized through the skits in the Performance Prompt.13) The culminating activity is the setting up of a Class Chesed Committee. See the description above.14) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.

Second Grade Chumash
3rd Trimester
PARSHAT CHAYYE SARAH: The Eternity of Israel
Summary: Students will study Parshat Chayye Sarah, focusing on eternity of the People and Land of Israel. Even as Sarah passes away, Rivkah takes on the role of Matriarch. Further, Sarah’s burial in Hevron further solidifies our connection to that Holy City. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Beresheet Chayye Sarah Workbook (Reshef Publishing)
Weekly Time:Resources: About 5.75 hoursfor students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Torah l’Tashbar series (Sukkath David)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il
Web Link: http://www.hebron.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) The Jewish People will live forever.3) Our connection to Eretz Yisrael is Eternal.3) Hevron is a holy city to the Jewish People.4) Ma'Aseh Avot Siman l'Banim- the Patriarchs and Matriarchs set the pattern for Jewish life.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why doesn’t Avraham accept Ma’arat Machpela as a gift?2) Was Rivkah the right wife for Avraham? Why or why not?3) Why would Jews today want to live in Hevron?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of this Torah Portion.2) Students will review key places of Israeli geography on a map.3) Students will know key Hebrew root words (See p. 68 of this curriculum).4) Students will be able to identify Ma’arat haMachpelah and who is buried there.5) Parshat haShvuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text- particularly focusing on chapters 23 and 24 (through verse 27) Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses-selected from chapters 23 and 24 (through verse 27). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 23 verses 1-6 and 9-20.This is a vital skill as they develop their textual fluency.3) Review: Students will be able to find a book, portion, chapter and verse in the Chumash.

ASSESSMENTS:
Performance Prompt: Eternal Israel
Students are asked, in small groups, to prepare skits regarding the story line of Parshat Chayye Sarah. Skits should surround: 1) Avraham purchasing Ma’arat haMachpela, 2) finding a wife for Yitzchak, 3) setting up the Jewish settlement in Hevron.

Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses from Parshat Chayye Sarah (Chapter 23 and 24 though verse 27). These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Product check The Verse Hunt
The teacher will ask students to find a verse in their Chumash (for example, "Find Beresheet Chapter 24 verse 3") and read or copy (depending on size of class) the verse. This is intended to check their ability to look up verses when asked.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should tell the students that we are ready to begin a new Parsha. We will learn more about Hevron- a very holy and special city in Israel. We will also learn about the second of the Imahot.2) The teacher reviews the location of Hevron. S/he shows pictures of the city. In computer class, an initial visit to www.hebron.org.il is helpful.3) At this point, we are ready to begin Beresheet (Genesis) Chapter 23. 4) The Parsha is studied chapter by chapter. The teacher sets the conceptual framework, relating to the key understandings and questions, before beginning the chapter.5) Once the chapter is introduced, the text is studied verse by verse in chapters 23 and 24 (through verse 27) and in an overview format for the other verses. Ideally, this is done in Hebrew. Please be sure to show pictures of Ma’arat haMachpela and discuss who is buried there.6) Verses are differentiated based on the ability of the individual children. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 23 verses 1-6 and 9-20.7) Verses are studied and reviewed in small groups. This allows the teacher to differentiate as appropriate. Be sure to use the map of Israel when discussing geography!8) Short class discussions take place every other day to reinforce content and to begin discussing the key questions. Please remember that we want students to have both the "big ideas" of the essential understandings as well as to begin to develop textual fluency.9) ACTIVITY: Once chapter 23 is finished, explore www.hebron.org.il. Show Hevron in modern times, and discuss why Jews feel it so important to live there. Try to set up an “e-pal” relationship with Jewish children in Hevron. Letters can also be written (in Hebrew) to send to second graders there. Remember to reinforce Ma’aseh Avot Siman L’Banim by comparing the modern settlement to Avraham’s purchase.10) SONG: Teach Mordecai Ben David’s “Hevron Me’Az v’L’Tamid”11) Verses and story line are reviewed (in Hebrew) using the Reshef workbook series and short answer questions from the teacher.12) Chapters are reviewed for story line in class using short essays and discussion questions. Reading is reviewed using reading comprehension quizzes.13) The Parsha is summarized through the skits in the Performance Prompt.14) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.

Third Grade Chumash
1st Trimester
PARSHIOT TOLDOT-VEYETZE
Summary: Students will study Parshiot Toldot and Vayetze. The theme of Ma’aseh Avot Siman L’Banim, particularly in a) Yitzchak’s tenacity in settling Israel and b) the relationship between Yaakov and Esav, continues. They will also learn Rashi script. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Beresheet Chumash Workbooks (Shy Publishing)Rashi script workbook (P’tach)
Weekly Time About 5.75 hours
Resources: for students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)list of key Hebrew words (pages 69-71 of this curriculum)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem (G-d) gave the Torah and the Land of Israel to the Jewish People.2) Ma'Aseh Avot Siman l'Banim- the Patriarchs and Matriarchs set the pattern for Jewish life.3) The battle between Yaakov and Esav lasts until Mashiach comes.4) Rashi helps us to understand the Torah.5) Torah study is enjoyable…even when it’s hard.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why should we learn Torah?2) Why do we have a connection to Eretz Yisrael?3) Why don’t Yaakov and Esav get along? How is the Ma’aseh Avot Siman L’Banim?4) Why does Esav not care about Yitzchak’s blessing?5) Are Rashi’s opinions more valid than ours?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of these Torah Portions.2) Students will be able to identify key places of Israeli geography on a map.3) Students will know key Biblical Hebrew words (See pages 69-71 of this curriculum.).4) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text (particularly focusing on chapters 26-30:3). Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses (selected from chapters 26-29). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 24 verses 19-32; chapter 25 verses 1-5, chapter 27 verses 1-2, 5-7, and 18-22; chapter 28 verses 10-19. This is a vital skill as they develop their textual fluency.3) Students will be able to identify all Hebrew letters in Rashi script and begin to be able to decode selections of Rashi’s commentary.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the sections of the parshiot covered. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary. There should also be at least one higher level thought question based on the Essential Questions above. Questions should be differentiated (both in content and whether they are in English or Hebrew) depending on the ability of the individual student.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses from the following from our parshiot: chapter 24 verses 19-32; chapter 25 verses 1-5, chapter 27 verses 1-2, 5-7, and 18-22; chapter 28 verses 10-19. These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Review Product check The Verse Hunt
The teacher will ask students to find a verse in their Chumash (for example, "Find Beresheet Chapter 27 verse 7) and read or copy (depending on size of class) the verse. This is intended to check their ability to look up verses when asked.
Performance Prompt: Ma’aseh Avot
Students are asked, in small groups, to prepare skits regarding the story line of these Parshiot. Skits should surround: 1) Yitzchak’s struggle for the wells, 2) Rivka’s pregnancy and giving birth, 3) Yaakov taking the b’racha, 4) Yaakov’s dream, 5) setting up a settlement in Yesha

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain to the students that we are going to continue to see the foundation of the Jewish People. We are going to learn about our ancestors and about our Land.2) The teacher also explains that we are going to begin looking this year at commentary on the Torah. This is important as we have both Torah Sh’Bichtav and Torah She’bal Peh and it’s impossible to understand one without the other.3) The teacher should review the concept of Ma'aseh Avot Siman L'Bamin--the Deeds of our Ancestors give a hint to the Jewish future. S/he should also review the mechanics of looking up a Parsha, chapter, and verse. The review product check above can be used.4) We now go topic by topic in the Parshiot, with particular focus on the Key Understandings and Essential Questions above. Key chapters and core verses are listed above. The workbook is used for review. Exposure to Rashi’s commentary (mostly “outside” during this trimester) is important. It is NOT necessary (or desirable) to do the entire workbook. Assessments are short answer and reading comprehension quizzes as above.5) Once we have finished Yitzchak’s taking the blessing, we are ready to begin learning Rashi script letters. We’ve waited until now as we want to cover some content in order to provide extra motivation as we get into this more difficult skill. Tell about the life of Rashi and why his commentary is so important.6) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.
Third Grade Chumash
2nd Trimester
PARSHAT VAYISHLACH
Summary: Students will study Parshat Vayishlach. The theme of Ma’aseh Avot Siman L’Banim continues. Students begin more exploration of Rashi’s commentary. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Beresheet Chumash WorkbooksRashi script workbook (P’tach)
Weekly Time About 5.75 hours
Resources: for students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem (G-d) gave the Torah and the Land of Israel to the Jewish People.2) Ma'Aseh Avot Siman l'Banim- the Patriarchs and Matriarchs set the pattern for Jewish3) The battle between Yaakov and Esav lasts until Mashiach comes.4) Rashi helps us to understand the Torah.5) Torah study is enjoyable…even when it’s hard.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why should we learn Torah?2) Why do we have a connection to Eretz Yisrael?3) Does Esav really hate Yaakov? How is this Ma’aseh Avot Siman L’Banim?4) Should Yaakov have bowed to Esav?5) How do Jews feel about war?6) Are Rashi’s opinions more valid than our’s?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of these Torah Portions.2) Students will be able to identify key places of Israeli geography on a map.3) Students will know key Biblical Hebrew words (See pages 69-71 of this curriculum.).4) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text (particularly focusing on chapters 32, 33 and 35). Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses (selected from chapters 32, 33 and 35). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 32 verses 4-10 and 23-30; chapter 33 verses 1-5; chapter 35 verses 9-12 and 27-29.3) Students will begin to be able to decode and explain selections of Rashi’s commentary.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the sections of the parsha. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary. There should also be at least one higher level thought question based on the Essential Questions above. Questions should be differentiated (both in content and whether they are in English or Hebrew) depending on the ability of the individual student.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses from the following from our parshiot: chapter 32 verses 4-10 and 23-30; chapter 33 verses 1-5; chapter 35 verses 9-12 and 27-29.These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Review Product check Where is Rashi?
The teacher will ask students to look up and read individual selections of Rashi’s commentary. In addition to continuing practice in Rashi, this is meant to reinforce the skills of finding a particular comment.
Performance Prompt: Ma’aseh Avot
Students are asked, in small groups, to prepare skits regarding the story line of these Parshiot. Skits should surround: 1) Yaakov preparing to meet Esav, 2) Yaakov becoming Yisrael, 3) Menachem Begin negotiating with Anwar Sadat

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain to the students that we are going to continue to see the foundation of the Jewish People. We are going to learn about our ancestors and about our Land.2) If we have finished the previous parshiot, we are now ready to go topic by topic in the Vayishlach, with particular focus on the Key Understandings and Essential Questions above. Key chapters and core verses are listed above. The workbook is used for review. Exposure to Rashi’s commentary (inside the text) is important. It is NOT necessary (or desirable) to do the entire workbook. Assessments are short answer and reading comprehension quizzes as above.3) Extra time will need to be spent teaching student’s to find an individual note in Rashi, as well as to explain how Rashi “works.” Please note the “Where’s Rashi” assessment above.4) The Performance Prompt above is the final assessment.5) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.
Third Grade Chumash
3rd Trimester
PARSHAT VAYESHEV
Summary: Students will study Parshat Vayeshev. The theme of Ma’aseh Avot Siman L’Banim continues. Students continue more exploration of Rashi’s commentary. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Beresheet Chumash Workbooks
Weekly Time About 5.75 hours
Resources: for students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem (G-d) gave the Torah and the Land of Israel to the Jewish People.2) Ma'Aseh Avot Siman l'Banim- the Patriarchs and Matriarchs set the pattern for Jewish life.3) Rashi helps us to understand the Torah.4) Torah study is enjoyable…even when it’s hard.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why should we learn Torah?2) How could the brothers have sold Yosef?3) How could Yaakov have had a favorite child?4) Why is Yosef called a Tzaddik?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of this Parsha.2) Students will be able to identify Israel, Egypt, the Nile River and the Sinai desert on a map.3) Students will know key Biblical Hebrew words (See pages 69-71 of this curriculum.).4) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text (particularly focusing on chapters 37 and 39-40). Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses (selected from chapters 37 and 39-40). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 37 verses 1-11 and 19-34. If there is time, chapter 40 can be done verse by verse.3) Students will be able to decode and explain selections of Rashi’s commentary.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the sections of the parsha covered. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary. There should also be at least one higher level thought question based on the Essential Questions above. Questions should be differentiated (both in content and whether they are in English or Hebrew) depending on the ability of the individual student.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses from the following:: chapter 37 verses 1-11 and 19-34.These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Product check What’s Rashi’s question?
Students are asked to find and explain particular Rashi’s that have been studied. Students should provide Rashi’s question and solution.
Performance Prompt: Ma’aseh Avot
Students are asked, in small groups, to prepare skits regarding the story line of these Parshiot. Skits should surround: 1) Yosef’s dreams, 2) the selling of Yosef, 3) Yosef in jail, 4) a third grader being tempted to do something and resisting

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain to the students that we are going to continue to see the foundation of the Jewish People. We are going to learn about our ancestors and about our Land.2) If we have finished the previous parshiot, we are now ready to go topic by topic in the Vayeshev, with particular focus on the Key Understandings and Essential Questions above. Key chapters and core verses are listed above. The workbook is used for review. Learning selections of Rashi’s commentary (inside the text) is important. It is NOT necessary (or desirable) to do the entire workbook. Assessments are short answer and reading comprehension quizzes as above.3) This trimester, there is more of Rashi’s commentary to cover. It is also important to begin training students to identify the questions Rashi raises- as well as his answers- to help us understand the Torah better.4) The Performance Prompt above is the final assessment.5) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.


Fourth Grade Chumash
1st Trimester
PARSHIOT MIKETZ-VAYIGASH
Summary: Students will study Parshiot Miketz-Vayigash. The theme of Ma’aseh Avot Siman L’Banim continues. Students continue more exploration of Rashi’s commentary. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Beresheet Chumash Workbooks (Shy Publishing)
Weekly Time About 4.75 hours
Resources: for students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem (G-d) gave the Torah and the Land of Israel to the Jewish People.2) Ma'Aseh Avot Siman l'Banim- the Patriarchs and Matriarchs set the pattern for Jewish life.3) Rashi helps us to understand the Torah.4) Torah study is enjoyable…even when it’s hard.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why can’t anyone interpret Pharoah’s seemingly simple dreams?2) Did Yosef’s dreams come true?3) Why is Yosef so important?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of these Parshiot.2) Students will know key Biblical Hebrew words (See pages 69-71 of this curriculum.).3) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text (particularly focusing on chapters 41-45). Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses (selected from chapters 41-45). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student. However, the minimum core verses are: Chapter 41, verses 1-9, 12, 14, 16, 25-27, 33, 38-42; chapter 42, verses 1-14; chapter 44, verses 18 and 33-34; chapter 45, verses 1-53) Students will be able to decode and explain selections of Rashi’s commentary.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the sections of the parshiot covered. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary. There should also be at least one higher level thought question based on the Essential Questions above. Questions should be differentiated (both in content and whether they are in English or Hebrew) depending on the ability of the individual student.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses from the following: Chapter 41, verses 1-9, 12, 14, 16, 25-27, 33, 38-42; chapter 42, verses 1-14; chapter 44, verses 18 and 33-34; chapter 45, verses 1-5These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Product check What’s Rashi’s question?
Students are asked to find and explain particular Rashi’s that have been studied. Students should provide Rashi’s question and solution.
Written Prompt: Ma’aseh Avot
Students are asked to write an essay in which they are either Yaakov, Yosef, Binyomin or Yehuda. Write the story from their person’s point of view.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain that we are going to see the climax of the Yosef stories.2) We will go topic by topic through these parshiot, with particular focus on the Key Understandings and Essential Questions above. Key chapters and core verses are listed above. The workbook is used for review. Learning selections of Rashi’s commentary (inside the text) is important. It is NOT necessary (or desirable) to do the entire workbook. Assessments are short answer and reading comprehension quizzes as above.3) This trimester, there is more of Rashi’s commentary to cover. It is also important to begin training students to analyze what is Rashi’s question…and what is his solution.4) The written prompt and the reading comprehension quiz above are the final assessments.5) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.

Fourth Grade Chumash
2nd Trimester
PARSHAT VAYECHI
Summary: Students will study Parshat Vayechi. The theme of Ma’aseh Avot Siman L’Banim continues. Students continue more exploration of Rashi’s commentary. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Beresheet Chumash Workbooks (Shy Publishing)
Weekly Time About 4.75 hours
Resources: for students:Chumash BeresheetParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Beresheet (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)The Commentators’ Shabbos (Rav Yitzchok Sender)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem (G-d) gave the Torah and the Land of Israel to the Jewish People.2) Hashem acts directly in history3) Ma'Aseh Avot Siman l'Banim- the Patriarchs and Matriarchs set the pattern for Jewish life.4) Great people take responsibility for their actions.5) Rashi helps us to understand the Torah.6) Torah study is enjoyable…even when it’s hard.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why do we bless sons in the names of Ephraim and Menasshe (and not the Avot)?2) Why does Yehuda get the kingship?3) What is the role of blessing children?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of Parshat Vayechi.2) Students will know key Biblical Hebrew words (See pages 69-71 of this curriculum.).3) the Friday night blessings (for boys and girls)4) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text (particularly focusing on chapters 47:28-31, 48, 49:28-50 and 50: 22-26). Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses (selected from chapters 47:28-31, 48, 49:28-50 and 50: 22-26). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student. However, the minimum core verses are: chapter 47 verses 28-31, chapter 48 verses 1-22, chapter 49 verses 8-10, chapter 50 verses 22-263) Students will be able to decode and explain selections of Rashi’s commentary.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the sections of the parsha covered. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary. There should also be at least one higher level thought question based on the Essential Questions above. Questions should be differentiated (both in content and whether they are in English or Hebrew) depending on the ability of the individual student.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses from the following: chapter 47 verses 28-31, chapter 48 verses 1-22, chapter 49 verses 8-10, chapter 50 verses 22-26These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Product check What’s Rashi’s question?
Students are asked to find and explain particular Rashi’s that have been studied. Students should provide Rashi’s question and solution.
Performance Task: Siyyum Beresheet
In honor of finishing Sefer Beresheet, we will have a Siyyum. It is up to the class to plan it…not just snacks, but appropriate Divrei Torah and songs. A skit would be good, too. Everyone needs to have a role in showing they understood something from the stories we have learned.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain that we are going to see the end of the lives of Yaakov and of Yosef. We are also going to learn about blessings.2) If we have finished the previous trimester’s material, we are now ready to go topic by topic through this parsha, with particular focus on the Key Understandings and Essential Questions above. Key chapters and core verses are listed above. The workbook is used for review. Learning selections of Rashi’s commentary (inside the text) is important. It is NOT necessary (or desirable) to do the entire workbook. Assessments are short answer and reading comprehension quizzes as above.3) Students should be taught the blessings for Friday night for both boys and girls (as well as their importance). Teach the song HaMalach haGoel.4) This trimester, there is more of Rashi’s commentary to cover. It is also important to begin training students to analyze what is Rashi’s question…and what is his solution.7) Discuss what a Siyyum is (more than just a party is key, here). Then, for the final performance task, we will have a Siyyum Beresheet.8) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.


Fourth Grade Chumash
3rd Trimester
PARSHIOT SHEMOT-VE’ERA-BO-BESHALACH
Summary: Students will study the parshiot of Yetziat Mitzrayim (the Exodus). Students continue more exploration of Rashi’s commentary. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Shemot Chumash Workbooks (Shy Publishing)Pesach Haggadah
Weekly Time About 4.75 hours
Resources: for students:Chumash ShemotPesach HagaddahParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Shemot (with Rashi and Ramban)Sefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.rabbijablon.com
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem acts directly in history.2) Yetziat Mitzraim (the exodus) was one of the central events that formed the Jewish People.3) All Jews are to view themselves as having left Egypt.4) Through establishing Rosh Chodesh, Jews were given a certain level of control over holy times.5) The initial Korban Pesach was an act of courage.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why was Moshe chosen to lead the Jewish People?2) Why should the Egyptians have been punished if Avraham was promised his children would be slaves?3) Why do we have to see ourselves as going out of Egypt?4) What’s the purpose of Yetziat Mitzrayim?5) Why is Rosh Chodesh so important?6) Was Az Yashir a proper celebration?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of these parshiot.2) Students will know key Biblical Hebrew words (See pages 69-71 of this curriculum.).3) Rosh Chodesh (meaning, importance, blessing, etc.)4) content, meaning and laws of Pesach Hagaddah (integrates with Dinim)5) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text. Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew.3) Students will be able to decode and explain selections of Rashi’s commentary.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the sections of the parshiot covered. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary. There should also be at least one higher level thought question based on the Essential Questions above. Questions should be differentiated (both in content and whether they are in English or Hebrew) depending on the ability of the individual student.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected verses. These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Product check What’s Rashi’s question?
Students are asked to find and explain particular Rashi’s that have been studied. Students should provide Rashi’s question and solution.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain that we are going to see the enslavement in and the exodus from Egypt. This is one of the key events in the formation of the Jewish People. In a very real sense, we move from being a family to being a Nation.2) If we have finished the previous trimester’s material, we are now ready to go topic by topic through this parsha, with particular focus on the Key Understandings and Essential Questions above. The workbook is used for review. Learning selections of Rashi’s commentary (inside the text) is important. It is NOT necessary (or desirable) to do the entire workbook. Assessments are short answer and reading comprehension quizzes as above.3) Students should be taught about Rosh Chodesh (source, importance, blessings and meaning).4) This trimester, there is more of Rashi’s commentary to cover. It is also important to begin training students to analyze what is Rashi’s question…and what is his solution.5) Integrated with Dinim, we also study the Haggadah of Pesach. Students should know the laws on Seder night, as well as the contect of the Hagaddah. Note, also, the difference between Pesach Mitztrayim, Pesach l’Dorot and Pesach without the Beit haMikdash.6) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes.


Fifth Grade Chumash
PARSHIOT YITRO THOUGH PIKUDEI
Summary: Students will study Yitro though the end of the Book of Shemot. The focus will be on the Giving of the Torah (including Torah m’Sinai, Jewish unity and laws applying to all area of life). Students continue more exploration of Rashi’s commentary. Texts are in Hebrew. Objectives are both conceptual-theology based and text fluency based.
Topics: Bible, Hebrew, Israel, social studies, philosophy
Print MaterialsNeeded: Chumash Shemot Chumash Workbooks (Shy Publishing)
Weekly Time About 4.75 hours
Resources: for students:Chumash ShemotParsha Primer (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)- sample follows the Chumash curriculum sectionfor teachers:Chumash Shemot (with Rashi and Ramban, as well as Ibn Ezra on the “Ten Commandments”)The MishkanSefer Tal Chermon (Rav Shlomo Aviner)
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.machonmeir.org.il

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem (G-d) gave the Torah and the Land of Israel to the Jewish People.2) Hashem directly reveled the Torah (Written and Oral).3) The “Ten Commandments” are the center of world civilization.4) The Torah regulates all aspects of life.5) Hashem commands us in the ways of justice.6) The sacrifices were an important way to relate to Hashem.7) The Mishkan was the center of the Jewish People.8) Some places have intrinsic Kedusha.9) Jewish Unity is essential.10) The commentators help us to understand the Torah.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) What is the source of the Torah? How do we know?2) We have 613 mitzvot…What is the big deal about the “Ten Commandments”?3) Why do non-Jews value the “Ten Commandments”?4) What does it mean to be a religious Jew?5) Why were we all at Sinai?6) Why are there tribes?7) Why does the Torah regulate business?8) If Hashem is “everywhere,” why do we need a Mishkan?9) Are the commentators’ opinions more valid than ours?
Key Knowledge and Skills:KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to summarize (in English or Hebrew) the story line of these Parshiot (with references to key commentaries).2) Students will know key Biblical Hebrew words (See pages 69-71 of this curriculum).3) Students will have absolute command of the content of the “Ten Commandments.”4) Honesty in business5) The concept of Kedushat haMakom6) Parshat haShavuahSKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text (particularly focusing on chapters 18-24 and 31-34). Skill level is differentiated for students.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected Hebrew verses (selected from chapters 18-24 and 31-34). Numbers of verses are differentiated based on the ability of the student.3) Students will be able to read and explain selections of Rashi’s commentary.4) Students will be able to prepare and deliver an original D’var Torah based on a Parsha and Rashi.5) Students will be able to “sight read” and explain at 80% accuracy narrative sections of Chumash and Midrashic Rashis.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the sections of the parshiot covered. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary. There should also be at least one higher level thought question based on the Essential Questions above. Questions should be differentiated (both in content and language) depending on the ability of the individual student.
Product check reading comprehension quiz
Students are asked to read and explain selected .These verses should have been already taught by the teacher and assigned for practice. This is a differentiated assignment as every student will receive a different number of verses (based on ability).
Product check What’s Rashi’s question?
Students are asked to find and explain particular Rashi’s that have been studied. Students should provide Rashi’s question and solution.
Written Prompt: The Ten Commandments
Students will write an essay explaining the “Ten Commandments” and their importance. This should be a differentiated assignment (based on the Hebrew and/or English writing abilities of the individual students).
Performance Task: D’var TorahStudents will prepare and deliver (in English) a 3-5 minute D’var Torah based on a Parshat haShavuah with selected Hebrew commentaries.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain that we are going to learn about the other central event that created the Jewish People—the Giving of the Torah.2) We are now ready to go topic by topic through these parshiot, with particular focus on the Key Understandings and Essential Questions above (These are vital to proper Emunah-faith). Key chapters are listed above. The workbook is used for review. Learning selections of Rashi’s commentary (inside the text) is important. It is NOT necessary (or desirable) to do the entire workbook. Assessments are short answer and reading comprehension quizzes as above.3) Honesty and Kedushat Makom are two important themes that integrate with these Parshiot.4) Parshat haShavuah is studied weekly for story line and two to three key themes. The assessment for this (as well as for text study in general) is preparing and delivering an original D’var Torah based on a Parsha with commentaries.



FIRST GRADE DINIM
Summary: Students focus on laws relating to prayer, Shabbat and holidays.
Weekly Time About 90-100 minutes
Resources: for teachers:Ma’agal haShannah613 Stories for the 613 Mizvotlibrary books on B’rachot, Shabbat and Holidaysclass voted upon Chesed project (can be combined with another class)
Internet Resource Links http://www.rabbijablon.comhttp://www.ou.org
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:
1) dinim, mitzvot, shirim, and minhagim for Shabbat and Holidays
2) Birkat haMazon

SKILLS:
1) Students will be able to correctly recite and summarize the meanings of blessings for meals (before and after).
2) B’rachot u’Zmirot for Shabbat and Holidays
ASSESSMENTS:
Group work
Holiday art projects
Games
Class discussions

Second Grade Dinim
Summary: Students focus on both Mitzvot Ben Adam La’Makom and Ben Adam l’Chavero. Many of the dinim are integrated with Chumash study.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 90-100 minutesArtscroll SiddurNCSY Birchon and Book of BlessingsSifron Chanukkah (BJE-New York)Sifron Purim (BJE-New York)Pesach HaggadahClass Chessed Committee (see Chumash curriculum)For teachers:The 39 Melachot
Internet Resource Links http://www.rabbijablon.comhttp://www.ou.org

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem gave us both Mitzvot Ben Adam la’Makom (between man and G-d) and Ben Adam le’Chavero (between fellow people). Both are crucial and required.
2) Being in Hashem’s image means emulating His ways of kindness.

Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:
1) review of Shabbat and holiday laws
2) Mitzvot Ben Adam l’Chavero: chesed, tzedakah,visiting the sick, returning lost objects
3) Mitzvot ben Adam la’Makom: b’rachot, Kashrut, tefilla, Shabbat do’s and don’ts

SKILLS:
1) ability to recite and explain proper b’rachot for mitzvot, food,drinks
2) ability to define Mitzvot ben Adam la’Makom and Mitzvot Ben Adam l’Chavero and give examples of each
6) ability to read and explain key elements of the Pesach Haggadah.

ASSESSMENTS:
Group work
Holiday art projects
Games
Active participation in the Chessed Committee
Class discussions
Student made Haggadah companions


Third Grade Dinim
Summary: Students focus on both Mitzvot Ben Adam La’Makom and Ben Adam l’Chavero. Many of the dinim are integrated with Chumash study.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 90-100 minutesArt Scroll SiddurPrimer in Kavod/Yirah/Derech Eretz (Project Derech)Pesach HaggadahClass voted upon Chesed project (can be combined with another grade)
Internet Resource Links http://www.rabbijablon.comhttp://www.ou.org

KEY UNDERSTANDING:
Hashem gave us both Mitzvot Ben Adam la’Makom (between man and G-d) and Ben Adam le’Chavero (between fellow people). Both are crucial and required.

Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:
1) Hilchot Tefilah
2) Hallel
3) Hilchot B’rachot
4) Hilchot Birkat haMazon
5) Halachot of honoring parents and elders
6) Halachot of the Holidays
7) Gemillut Chassadim
SKILLS:
1) ability to explain the halachot learned
2) ability to read and explain key elements of the Pesach Haggadah.

ASSESSMENTS:
Group work
Worksheets
Class discussions
Student made Haggadah companions

Fourth Grade Dinim
Summary: Students focus on both Mitzvot Ben Adam La’Makom and Ben Adam l’Chavero. Many of the dinim are integrated with Chumash and Mishna study.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 90-100 minutesHalichot Yisrael (Torah u’Mesorah)Art Scroll SiddurPesach Haggadah (Hagaddah Sheli-Tuvia’s Bookstore edition)Class voted upon Chesed project (can be combined with another grade)Hebrew biographies and Encyclopedia entries on great rabbis below
Internet Resource Links http://www.rabbijablon.comhttp://www.ou.org

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem gave us both Mitzvot Ben Adam la’Makom (between man and G-d) and Ben Adam le’Chavero (between fellow people). Both are crucial and required.
2) There are many sources for the development of halacha.
3) Observing halacha brings us closer to Hashem.

Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:
1) review of difference between Mitzvot Ben Adam La’Makom and Ben Adam l’Chavero
2) sources of halacha: Mishna, Gemara, Mishna Torah, Shulchan Aruch, Mishna Berurah
3) key rabbis: Rambam, Rav Yosef Karo, Chofetz Chaim, Rav Kook, Rav Tzvi Yehuda Kook
4) Hilchot Tzedakah
5) Hilchot Chesed
6) Hilchot Netilat Yedayyim
7) Hilchot Birkat HaMazon
8) Hilchot Ahavat Yisrael
9) Hilchot Teshuvah
10) Hilchot Pesach
11) Mitzvat Yishuv haAretz

SKILLS:
1) ability to explain the halachot learned
2) ability to read and summarize halachot written in simple Hebrew

ASSESSMENTS:
Worksheets
Class discussions
Student made Haggadot
Short research report on a great Rabbi (differentiated assignment- Some children should do this in Hebrew.)
Oral explanations
Letters explaining halachot to younger children


Fifth Grade Dinim
Summary: Students focus on both Mitzvot Ben Adam La’Makom and Ben Adam l’Chavero. Many of the dinim are integrated with their study of Messechet B’rachot, as well as our focus on Religious Zionism. Other topics are through the Ivrit b’Ivrit Halacha Yomit program.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 90 minutesHalacha Yomit (R. Tzvi Harris)Mishna B’rachotArtscroll SiddurPesach Haggadah (Hagaddah Sheli- Tuvia’s Bookstore edition)Classes voted upon Chesed project (can be combined with another grade)
Internet Resource Links http://www.rabbijablon.comhttp://www.ou.orghttp://www.halachayomit.com

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Rabbis consult many sources to make halachic decisions.
2) Observing halacha brings us closer to Hashem.

Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE
1) Key Rabbis: Ben Ish Chai, Rav Yosef Dov Soloveichik, Rav Ben Zion Uzziel
2) Key Texts: Tur, Shulchan Aruch, Kaf haHayyim, Kitzur Shulchan Aruch
3) Concept of Sh’eylot u’Teshuvot
4) Hilchot Yom Tov
5) Mitzvot T’luyot Ba’aretz
6) Hilchot Birkat haMazon
7) Hilchot Kriat Shema
8) Hilchot Tefillah
9) Other topics per Halacha Yomit program

SKILLS:
1) ability to explain the halachot learned and apply them to daily life
2) ability to read and summarize halachot written in Hebrew
3) ability to write an original, source based D’var Torah on the Pesach Seder.

ASSESSMENTS:
Class discussions
Student made Haggadot
Review quizzes
Oral explanations
Writing “responsa”

HALACHA YOMIT:
The Halacha Yomit program is an Ivrit b’Ivrit program that changes yearly. Holiday topics, as well as some halachot relating to Eretz Yisrael, are always part of the program. Rabbi Tzvi Harris provides the school, for an annual fee, with “black line masters” that are used to create handouts for students. F.M.S. participates in this program. Sample pages from the 5762 school year follow. Further information is at www.halachayomit.com.













Fourth Grade Mishna
2nd-3rd Trimesters
Introduction to Mishna: Pirke Avot
Print Materials Mishna Avot
Weekly Time About 1.5-1.7 hours
Resources: Mishna Avot (commentary from Bartenura and Rav Kahati)Art Scroll Youth Pirke AvotWhat is Mishna (Rabbi Levi Solomon)

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Hashem revealed both the Written and Oral Torah.2) Since Hashem revealed the entire Torah, the ethics in Pirke Avot are also from Sinai (see Bartenura’s commentary to Avot 1:1)
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to identify and explain the mishnayot of Messechet Avot (with particular focus on ethics)2) Students will be able to identify the Source and the process of codification of the Mishna.3) Students will be able to identify all six orders of the Mishna, and the difference between Mishna and Gemara.4) Students will be able to identify the Rav of Bartenura as one of the key commentators on the Mishna.SKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text of all mishnayot studied.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain selected mishnayot.3) Students will be able to look up Messechet Avot in a standard Seder Nezikin, as well as to find an individual Mishna in the Messechet.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the Mishnayot covered. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary.
Product check Oral Reading
Students are asked to read orally for their teacher.
Project:
Students are asked to complete projects that explain the content of selected Mishnayot to others. On particular project would be to develop a poster or game for teaching second graders the lessons of a “favorite” Mishna.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should explain the difference between Torah She’Bichtav and Torah She’Ba’al Peh, as well as that both were revealed to Hashem. The teacher explains “Mishna Geography”- what it is, how to find a Messechet and a Mishna, the names of the Orders of the Mishna, and how this differs from Gemara. The small packet that follows, What is Mishna?, may be used to teach and reinforce these introductory items. This packet is by Rabbi Levi Solomon of Los Angeles, and is from the Torah uMesorah Creative Learning Pavillion, and is available at www.e-chinuch.org.2) Ideally, the class is able to learn all of Pirke Avot during these two trimesters. Some commentary should be covered. However, this should certainly be differentiated for the class.






Fifth Grade Mishna

Messechet Brachot
Summary: Students study Messechet B’rachot as a core part of their Judaic Studies program.
Topics: Mishna, Jewish law, prayer
Print MaterialsNeeded: Mishna B’rachot
Weekly Time About 2 hours
Resources: Mishna B’rachot (commentary from Bartenura and Rav Kahati)

KEY UNDERSTANDING:
The Mishna is a key source in the development of Halacha.
Key Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Students will be able to explain the content of Mishna B’rachot.2) Students will know how to properly recite Shema, Birkat haMazon and the Amida.3) Students will understand how the Mishnayot impact the Halachot related to them.SKILLS:1) Students will be able to fluently (95% accuracy) decode the Hebrew text of all mishnayot studied.2) Students will be able to fluently read and explain (based on commentaries studied) selected mishnayot.3) Students will be able to look up Messechet Avot in a standard Seder Ze’raim, as well as to find an individual Mishna in the Messechet.

ASSESSMENTS:
Product Prompt Short Answer Quiz
Students are asked to answer short questions on the Mishnayot covered. These are content questions based on peshat (simple meaning) and commentary.
Product check Oral Reading
Students are asked to read orally for their teacher.



LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher explains what halacha is, and what it sources are. The teacher also explains the role of Mishna in this.2) The teacher introduces Messechet B’rachot and the topics that it covers. 3) The goal is to cover all of the Messechet during the year. We focus on students being able to read and explain the Mishnayot from the original.4) This program is integrated with aspects of the halacha curriculum.
TEFILLAH CURRICULUM

Summary: Students will learn Tefillot of Shacharit and food related B’rachot. The curriculum builds upon itself such that every grade has the same objectives and content as prior years in addition to their new material.
Daily Time:Resources: About 40 minutesA weekday SiddurBirchon

Key Understandings:
1) We love to pray daily.2) It is important to thank Hashem.3) Though we can always pray our own prayers, often we have prayers that must be said at a particular time and in a particular way.4) Tefilla unites the Jewish People (since we pray in the plural, in the same language an din the same way).5) Tefilla connects us with Eretz Yisrael.


Skills and Knowledge
SKILLS:1) proper care of the Siddur and Birchon2) ability to sing/chant key tefillot3) ability to find tefillot in the Siddur (by mid-4th grade: in any Siddur)4) ability to explain the general meaning of the prayers and blessings said5) ability to act appropriately during tefillot and b’rachot KINDERGARTEN KNOWLEDGE:B’rachot for foodFirst paragraph of Birkat haMazonBorei NefashotDaily TefillotModeh AniTorah Tziva Lanu MosheShemaB’racha for TzitzitBirkat Sh’asani KirtzonoAdon OlamGRADE ONE KNOWLEDGE:Birchot haTorahMah TovuBirchot haShacharAhavah Rabbah (though B’racha Ohev Amo Yisrael)Kriat Shema (all)Amida (1st three paragprahs)AleynuOseh ShalomElokeynuAdon OlamYigdalFood b’rachotBirkat haMazon (all)Shabbat KiddushGRADE TWO KNOWLEDGE:All of the above plusBaruch Sh’EmarAshreiBracha Yotzer OhrMi Chamocha-Bracha Ga’al YisraelAmida (all-out loud)Songs for Torah serviceGRADE THREE KNOWLEDGE:All of the above plusFinal HallelukaAz YashirAhavah Rabbah (all)Hallel (when appropriate)Amida (all-silently, reviewing one b’racha weekly)Structure of the Amida (shevach, bakasha, hodaya)GRADE FOUR KNOWLEDGE:All of the above plusAll of Birchot Kriat ShemaTefilla l’Shalom haMedinaMi She’berach l’Cholim/l’TzahalGRADE FIVE KNOWLEDGE:All of the above plus1) writing original tefillot2) leading others in tefillot3) proper decorum for tefillot4) saying Kriat Shema with ta’amim

Kindergarten Ivrit
Summary: Students learn to read, write and speak Hebrew. Students already reading Hebrew area able to read more challenging materials. This program is totally integrated with all other aspects of the first grade Judaic Studies program (as success in Torah studies is dependent on learning to read and understanding Hebrew).
Resources: D’vash u’Chalav (Jewish Agency)Likro B’Kef (Mata”ch)Alef Bet chartHebrew word wall

Knowledge and Skills:
SKILLS:1. Letter and sound recognition2. beginning opportunities for Hebrew conversation3. book handling skills4. use of Hebrew vocabulary5. ability to sing Hebrew songs

ASSESSMENTS
1. student portfolios2. teacher observations3. Hebrew conversationLEARNING ACTIVITIES:Key Ways We Support Language Development:• Teachers explain unfamiliar words and introduce new vocabulary within the context of activities and the interests of the children.• There are many opportunities for discussions with the children about what they are thinking and doing.• We provide numerous opportunities for Hebrew conversations within the context of classroom activities.• Children have many opportunities for dramatic play, and block construction where children use language to problem solve and share ideas.• There are many opportunities to read with the teacher in English and Hebrew, both individually and in groups. Children also have visits from “reading buddies” in older grades.• We provide time and opportunities for experimentation and exploration of many concepts and skills in the area of reading and writing in a print rich environment. These include:• book handling skills, such as reading right to left in Hebrew• connecting the relationship between the alphabet and the letter sounds• writing of charts and lists with the help of the teacher and independently• A particularly exciting feature of the D’vash u’Chalav program is the ability for parents and children to check out books and tapes. This allows families to work together at home on reinforcing, or extending, the program.More specific information and programming ideas are in the D’vash U’Chalav materials.

First Grade Ivrit
Summary: Students learn to read, write and speak Hebrew. Students already reading Hebrew area able to read more challenging materials. This program is totally integrated with all other aspects of the first grade Judaic Studies program (as success in Torah studies is dependent on learning to read and understanding Hebrew).
Resources: The Tal Am programBeresheet 1-2:3 in Hebrew

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1. Reading and understanding Hebrew is a key to understanding the Torah.2. Hebrew is both the ancient and modern language of the Jewish People.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Names and sounds of all letters and vowels.2. Introduction to Hebrew grammar: gender, plural/singular, prefixes, prepositions, question words3. The Jewish Calendar4. Hebrew reading, writing, speaking, and listening5. Hebrew storiesSKILLS:1. Letter and vowel recognition2. Reading Hebrew3. Writing Hebrew (block and script)4. Basic Hebrew conversation (simple and compound sentences)5. How to read from a Chumash

ASSESSMENTS
1. Oral reading for the teacher2. Parsha and Holiday art projects3. Short oral plays4. Workbooks for review5. Vocabulary quizzes6. Writing of short, written sentences7. Oral discussions8. Review games

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
Students are exposed to an all Hebrew environment of song, stories, games and conversations. Many of the stories in the Tal Am program are brought to life with special visitors (playing characters from the stories). A particularly exciting feature of the program is the ability for parents and children to check out books and tapes. This allows families to work together at home on reinforcing, or extending, the program.

After Chanukkah, we begin Hebrew Story Time in the F.M.S. Library.

More specific information and programming ideas are in the Tal Am materials.

Second Grade Ivrit
Summary: Students strengthen their abilities to read and speak Hebrew.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 3.3 weekly hoursYesodot haLashon 1 (Shy Publishing)First part of Yesodot haLashon 2HaMikra Sheli 2 (Shy Publishing)Library of Hebrew books (including from Tal Sela and Gesher series) from F.M.S. library and classList of high frequency vocabulary words

Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Hebrew stories2. Hebrew conversation3. Hebrew writing4. Listening to Hebrew stories5. Hebrew grammar: gender, pronouns, prepositions, possessives, roots, singular/ plural, Numbers6. GematriahSKILLS:1. Ability to comfortably speak in compound, complex, questioning, answering and comparative sentences2. Ability to fluently read and demonstrate understanding of short Hebrew stories3. Ability to write simple and complex sentences.4. Ability to answer questions, in Hebrew, which reflect understanding of a passage read or story told5. Ability to write short Hebrew compositions

ASSESSMENTS
1. Reading for the teacher2. Reading Hebrew stories to younger "reading buddies"3. Short oral plays4. Short written essays5. Workbook exercises6. Oral conversations in class7. short projects on Hebrew books read (differentiated based on individual students’ abilities)8. Sentences using "high frequency" vocabulary words

Third Grade Ivrit
Summary: Students strengthen their abilities to read and speak Hebrew.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 3.3 weekly hoursSecond part, Yesodot haLashon 2 (Shy Publishing)Yesodot haLashon 3(Shy Publishing)HaMikra Sheli 3Selections from the Tal Sela seriesHebrew dictionaryLibrary Hebrew books (including from the Gesher series) read to and by students

Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Hebrew stories2. Hebrew conversation3. Hebrew grammar: pronouns, present and past tense, comparative words, interrogatives, 4. connecting words, numbers, time5. Days of the week and months of the yearSKILLS:1. Ability to speak comfortably in both present and past tense2. Ability to understand all teacher instructions3. Ability to comprehend read and written passages in Hebrew4. Ability to use a Hebrew dictionary5. Ability to write stories and compositions (with the aid of a dictionary)

ASSESSMENTS
1. Written book reports2. Short written essays3. Reading for the teacher4. Short oral plays5. Workbook exercises6. Oral conversations in class7. Sentences using "high frequency" vocabulary words

Fourth Grade Ivrit
Summary: Students strengthen their abilities to read, write and speak Hebrew. Students are expected to use their Ivrit skills to succeed in all areas of Torah Studies.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.75 weekly hoursYesodot haLashon 4 (Shy Publishing)HaMikra Sheli 4 (Shy Publishing)Sulam Ya’akov Newspaper (Histadtrut)Library of Hebrew books (including from the Tal Sela series and Gesher series)

Knowledge and Skills:
SKILLS:1. Ability to comfortably speak Hebrew in past, present, and elements of the future tense2. Beginning to be able to participate in a class conducted entirely in Hebrew3. Ability to read and understand short Hebrew stories and articles4. Ability to deliver an oral report of a Hebrew book read5. Ability to comfortably identify root words6. Ability to use the command tense7. Ability to write Hebrew compositions and stories8. ability to deliver a short D’var Torah in Hebrew

ASSESSMENTS
1. Written book reports2. Short oral plays3. Workbook exercises4. Oral conversations in class5. a short D’var Torah delivered in Hebrew6. Sentences using "high frequency" vocabulary words

Fifth Grade Ivrit
Summary: Students strengthen their abilities to read, write and speak Hebrew. Students are expected to be able to use their Ivrit skills to succeed in all areas of Torah Studies.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.75 weekly hoursYesodot haLashon 5 (Shy Publishing)Ivrit Sheeta’teet 1 (Shy Publishing)Halacha Yomit (Rabbi Tzvi Harris)Library Hebrew books (including from the Tal Sela series and Gesher series)Dagesh (word processing program)

Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Great Religious Zionist Rabbis2. Hebrew stories3. Hebrew grammar reviewSKILLS:1. The ability to participate in a Hebrew class conducted solely in Hebrew (This is differentiated based on the ability of the children.)2. Ability to comfortably converse in Hebrew in past, present and future tense3. Ability to read and understand short Hebrew books and articles written without vowels (integrates with the Halacha Yomit program)4. Ability to write a book report on a Hebrew book (differentiated to match the abilities of individual students)5. Ability to write a Hebrew composition, story and letter6. Ability to identify Hebrew acronyms (roshei teyvot)7. ability to deliver a D’var Torah in Hebrew8. Hebrew word processing

ASSESSMENTS
1. Written book reports2. Hebrew D’var Torah3. Short oral plays4. Short research project (essay or poster, as assigned) on a great Religious Zionist Rabbi 5. Workbook exercises6. Oral conversations in class







GENERAL STUDIES
“Torah is wonderful with Derekh Eretz (the ways of the world/ general studies)!”
____Pirke Avot (the Ethics of the Fathers)

Kindergarten Fine Arts
Summary: Our fine arts program emphasizes self expression, exposure to a wide variety of arts experiences and integration with elements of the Judaic Studies and General Studies curricula.


Key Understandings:
1. Everyone has a variety of ways in which they can express themselves. 2. Many different kinds of art (including our own) have value.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Wide range of Jewish and Israeli songs2. introduction to various media3. Art projects integrated with Jewish holidays and themes4. Exploration of line, shape and colorSKILLS:1. Children explore different ways of using media.2. Children learn basics of art, shape, line and color.3. Children develop awareness of rhythm and beat through singing and games.4. Children learn about pitch, high and low in music and how the size of the instrument affects pitch.5. Children demonstrate pitch awareness by acting out different sized animals and through story telling.

ASSESSMENTS1. Student portfolios2. Teacher observations

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Children are exposed to art and music both within the regular classroom activities and also through activities provided by art and music specialists. Children have the opportunity to perform music and display their artwork for their parents and teachers.

First Grade Fine Arts
Summary: Our fine arts program emphasizes self expression, exposure to a wide variety of arts experiences and integration with elements of the Judaic Studies and General Studies curricula.
Weekly Time: About 1.25 weekly hours

Key Understandings:
1) 1) Everyone has a variety of ways in which they can express themselves. 2) Artists from different times and cultures have made art and objects for different purposes.3) Many different kinds of art (including our own) have value.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Wide range of Jewish and Israeli songs2) Singing games that teach group performance3) Art projects integrated with Jewish holidays and themes4) Exploration of line, shape and colorSKILLS:1. Ability to find rhythm and beat in music2. Ability to use simple percussion instruments3. Ability to sing in a cooperative group4. Developing fine motor skills (cutting, gluing, folding, drawing)5. Ability to use their imagination to create art.6. Ability to use various media (e.g. chalk, crayon, pains, yarn, paper, colored pencil, charcoal, pastels, pencils, colored pencils) to create art

CRITEREA FOR ASSESSMENTSART:Expresses oneself in a variety of mediaExpresses oneself creativelyParticipation (including openness to new experiences)MUSIC:Performance skillsKnows material under studyPerforms well in a groupParticipation (including openness to new experiences)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Experiences Include:1. Weekly class in music 2. Weekly class in art3. Annual Jewish music concert4. a tour at the Cleveland Museum of Art5. Participating in the Jewish Federation “Super Sunday” Kuppat Tzedakah project6. Using story books and elements of nature to inspire art7. Opportunities for extracurricular programs in art and music
Second Grade Fine Arts

Summary: Our fine arts program emphasizes self expression, exposure to a wide variety of arts experiences and integration with elements of the Judaic Studies and General Studies curricula.
Weekly Time: About 1.25 weekly hours

Key Understandings:
1. Everyone has a variety of ways in which they can express themselves. 2. Art is different in different cultures and at different times3. Many different kinds of art (including our own) have value.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Wide range of Jewish and Israeli songs2. Singing games that teach group performance3. Exploration of line, shape and color4. Introduction to art history5. Introduction to abstract vs. realistic art6. Art projects integrated with Judaic studies, science and social studiesSKILLS:1. Ability to analyze rhythmic patters with notation2. Ability to use instruments to help communicate and tell stories.3. Ability to match voice with pitch4. introduction to the ability to read music5. Ability to sing in a cooperative group6. Ability to use various media (e.g. chalk, crayon, pains, yarn, paper, colored pencil, charcoal, pastels, pencils, colored pencils) to create art7. introduction to weaving8. Ability to express oneself imaginatively9. Ability to demonstrate measuring and symmetry

CRITEREA FOR ASSESSMENTSART:Expresses oneself in a variety of mediaExpresses oneself creativelyParticipation (including openness to new experiences)MUSIC:Performance skillsKnows material under studyPerforms well in a groupParticipation (including openness to new experiences)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Experiences Include:1. Weekly class in music 2. Weekly class in art3. performing for groups4. Annual Jewish music concert5. a tour at the Cleveland Museum of Art6. Participating in the Jewish Federation “Super Sunday” Kuppat Tzedakah project7. Using story books and elements of nature to inspire art8. Opportunities for extracurricular programs in art, Makhela (performance choir) and “chamber orchestra”
Third Grade Fine Arts
Summary: Our fine arts program emphasizes self expression, exposure to a wide variety of arts experiences and integration with elements of the Judaic Studies and General Studies curricula.
Weekly Time: About 1.25 weekly hours

Key Understandings:
1. Everyone has a variety of ways in which they can express themselves. 2. We can appreciate our own creative work, and that of others.3. Artists from different times and cultures have made art and objects for different purposes.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Group singing and performance2. The work of various artists (e.g. Mondrian, Monet, Picasso, Chagall)3. Self portraits to compliment reading units4. Japanese artSKILLS:1. Strengthening ability to read music2. Introduction to playing the recorder (both solo and as a group)3. Ability to sing in canon and simple harmony4. Ability to express oneself creatively5. introduction to the ability to evaluate art and music6. Ability to use various media (e.g. chalk, crayon, pains, yarn, paper, colored pencil, charcoal, pastels, pencils, colored pencils) to create art7. Ability to make creative collages using various media

CRITEREA FOR ASSESSMENTSART:Expresses oneself in a variety of mediaExpresses oneself creativelyParticipation (including openness to new experiences)MUSIC:Performance skillsKnows material under studyPerforms well in a groupParticipation (including openness to new experiences)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Experiences Include:1. Weekly class in music 2. Weekly class in art3. performing for groups4. Annual Jewish music concert5. Participating in the Jewish Federation “Super Sunday” Kuppat Tzedakah project6. a tour at the Cleveland Museum of Art7. Opportunities for extracurricular programs in art, Makhela (performance choir) and “chamber orchestra”


Fourth Grade Fine Arts

Summary: Our fine arts program emphasizes self expression, exposure to a wide variety of arts experiences and integration with elements of the Judaic Studies and General Studies curricula.
Weekly Time: About 1.25 weekly hours

Key Understandings:
1. Everyone has a variety of ways in which they can express themselves. 2. Artists from different times and cultures have made art and objects for different purposes. 3. Many different kinds of art (including our own) have value.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Wide range of Jewish and Israeli songs2. The instruments of the symphony orchestra and their sounds3. Introduction to famous classical composers4. Introduction to different styles of music5. Art projects integrated with Judaic holidays and themes6. Art history7. Art vocabulary: landscape, still life, cityscape, foreground, background, realistic, abstract8. Native American art9. Stiching and other pioneer artSKILLS:1. Strengthening ability to read music2. playing the recorder (both solo and as a group)3. Ability to sing as a group4. Ability to express oneself creatively using various types of media (e.g. chalk, crayon, pains, yarn, paper, colored pencil, charcoal, pastels, pencils, colored pencils) and design (such as balance, positive/negative space)to create art5. Strengthening skills in measuring6. Ability to critically discuss various kinds of artwork.

CRITEREA FOR ASSESSMENTSART:Expresses oneself in a variety of mediaExpresses oneself creativelyParticipation (including openness to new experiences)MUSIC:Performance skillsKnows material under studyPerforms well in a groupParticipation (including openness to new experiences)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Experiences Include:1. Weekly class in music 2. Weekly class in art3. Performing for groups4. Jewish music concert5. Cleveland Symphony youth concert6. a tour at the Cleveland Museum of Art7. Participating in the Jewish Federation “Super Sunday” Kuppat Tzedakah project8. Opportunities for extracurricular programs in art, Makhela (performance choir) and “chamber orchestra”
Fifth Grade Fine Arts
Summary: Our fine arts program emphasizes self expression, exposure to a wide variety of arts experiences and integration with elements of the Judaic Studies and General Studies curricula.
Weekly Time: About 1.25 weekly hours

Key Understandings:
1. Everyone has a variety of ways in which they can express themselves. 2. Artists from different times and cultures have made art and objects for different purposes. 3. Many different kinds of art (including our own) have value.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Wide range of Jewish and Israeli songs2. different styles of world music3. discovering what is exciting about music for them and why4. integration of math and art5. figure drawingSKILLS:1. Strengthening ability to read music2. Strengthening ability in playing a musical instrument3. Ability to use music to express ideas and create musical experiences4. Ability to sing as a group5. Art projects integrated with Jewish holidays and themes6. Ability to express oneself creatively using various types of media (e.g. chalk, crayon, pains, yarn, paper, colored pencil, charcoal, pastels, pencils, colored pencils) and design (such as balance, positive/negative space)to create art7. Ability to use art of a variety of styles and cultures as inspiration for art8. Ability to critically discuss various kinds of art work

CRITEREA FOR ASSESSMENTSART:Expresses oneself in a variety of mediaExpresses oneself creativelyParticipation (including openness to new experiences)MUSIC:Performance skillsKnows material under studyPerforms well in a groupParticipation (including openness to new experiences)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Experiences Include:1. Weekly class in music 2. Weekly class in art3. Performing for groups4. Jewish music concert5. Cleveland Symphony youth concert6. a tour at the Cleveland Museum of Art7. Participating in the Jewish Federation “Super Sunday” Kuppat Tzedakah project8. Opportunities for extracurricular programs in art, Makhela (performance choir) and “chamber orchestra”


Kindergarten Language Arts

Summary: As a developmental kindergarten, we understand that children will learn to read at different times. Some kindergarten students will read entering kindergarten, others when they leave, and many will only have letter recognition. Yet, in a child centered environment, every child will be able to progress at their own pace.
Resources: Key words displayedAlphabet chartsWord walls and first dictionariesF.M.S. LibraryClassroom libraryChild-parent selected books at home

Key Understandings:
1) Reading is power.2) Reading is fun.
Knowledge and Skills:
SKILLS:1) English letter and sound recognition2) Book handling skills3) Using vocabulary lists to make lists and charts4) Beginning writing skills (including journaling)

ASSESSMENTS
1) Teacher observations2) Student journals3) Student portfolios4) Student re-telling of stories

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Typical five and six year olds increase their vocabulary rapidly. We do not pressure children to learn to read in Kindergarten. Some are ready for this skill, while others are not. Most children, by the end of kindergarten, recognize all letters and sounds in both Hebrew and English. They can also tell a story.Key Ways We Support This Development:• Teachers explain unfamiliar words and introduce new vocabulary within the context of activities and the interests of the children.• There are many opportunities for discussions with the children about what they are thinking and doing.• We provide numerous opportunities for Hebrew conversations within the context of classroom activities.• Children have many opportunities for dramatic play, and block construction where children use language to problem solve and share ideas.• There are many opportunities to read with the teacher in English and Hebrew, both individually and in groups. Children also have visits from “reading buddies” in older grades and a read to by teachers.• Children check out books from the F.M.S. Library.• We provide time and opportunities for experimentation and exploration of many concepts and skills in the area of reading and writing in a print rich environment. These include:• book handling skills, such as reading from left to right in English and right to left in Hebrew• connecting the relationship between the alphabet and the letter sounds, both in English and Hebrew.• writing of charts and lists with the help of the teacher and independently, both in English and Hebrew.• Journal and story writing
First Grade Language Arts
1st Trimester

Summary: The primary objective of first graders is to become comfortable reading and writing in English. Our program places heavy emphasis on reading and writing (with other skills being learned primarily through these two areas), critical thinking and integration with other curricular areas.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 5.5 weekly hoursSunshine book setsSRA Reading LabsPhonics workbook (Modern Curriculum Press)Big books poetry collectionWord banks and first dictionariesClass generated word wallsF.M.S. and classroom librariesChild-parent selected books at home

Key Understandings:
1) Reading is power.2) Reading is the key to language.3) A sentence is a group of words and has a complete idea.4) Stories have elements in common.
Essential Question: Why do we read? Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) consonant sounds and blends (e.g.: sh, th, ch)2) endings (plural and gerunds)3) short vowels4) exposure to different genres of literature (fiction, non fiction, folklore, poetry)SKILLS:1) reading for comprehension (differentiated as appropriate)2) use of word attack skills to read stories and poems3) writing letters, words and sentences4) identifying phonemes5) proper use of periods

ASSESSMENTS
1) reading logs (Students read or are read to 20 minutes three nights a week)2) reading comprehension questions3) writing samples4) word sorts

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The key element to first grade is learning to read and write. Children entering first grade are at various levels. Some are already reading fluently. Some may only recognize the letters.2) Much of the curriculum, therefore, is designed to encourage all students, on their own level, to become more comfortable at reading and writing.3) All students spend a significant amount of time reading in class. This is accomplished in differentiated reading groups (depending on the level of the children in the class). 4) Through use of the Reading Labs (for individuals) and the big books (for groups), as well as twice weekly writing journals, all students progress to becoming comfortable reading.5) Reading at home is the primary homework assignment…and is crucial for advancement in literacy.6) Please see the Social Studies curriculum for elements of integration.7) When possible with scheduling, children attend the performance of a professional play.
First Grade Language Arts
2nd-3rd Trimesters

Summary: The primary objective of first graders is to become comfortable reading and writing in English. Our program places heavy emphasis on reading and writing (with other skills being learned primarily through these two areas), critical thinking and integration with other curricular areas.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 5.5 weekly hoursSunshine book setsSRA Reading LabsPhonics workbook (Modern Curriculum Press)Sunshine books setsRigby non-fiction set (orange level-pets)Big books poetry collectionWord banks and first dictionariesClass generated word wallsF.M.S. and classroom librariesChild-parent selected books at home

Key Understandings:
1) We edit our written work.2) Stories have common elements.3) Reading is the key to language.4) Reading is power.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) “ed” ending2) long and short vowels3) “the writing process” (brainstorming-first draft-editing-peer editing-second draft-teacher editing-final draft)4) exposure to different genres of literature (fiction, non-fiction, folklore, poetry)SKILLS:1) story and letter writing2) identifying story elements3) predicting story events4) use of a dictionary5) correct use of question marks and exclamation points6) reading with fluency and understanding (differentiated by level)

ASSESSMENTS
1) reading logs (Students read or are read to 20 minutes three nights a week)2) reading comprehension questions3) writing samples4) writing and publishing at least one book (using the “writing process”)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) All students spend a significant amount of time reading in class and at home. This is accomplished in differentiated reading groups (depending on the level of the children in the class). 2) Through use of the Reading Labs (for individuals) and the big books (for groups), as well as writing journals, all students progress to becoming comfortable reading.3) The major assessment of writing progress is through the writing and publishing of at least one book. This should follow the “writing process.” Every child should write and illustrate their own book. Those who are able (and time permitting) should type. The books should be spiral bound and presented to parents at an “author’s tea.”4) Please see the Social Studies curriculum for elements of integration.
Second Grade Language Arts
1st Trimester

Summary: The primary objective of second graders is to become more comfortable reading and writing in English. Our program places heavy emphasis on reading and writing (with other skills being learned primarily through these two areas), critical thinking and integration with other curricular areas.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 5.5 weekly hoursSunflowerStar FireMouse TalesThe One in the Middle is the KangarooBones for LunchYou are Special My Wonderful Aunt #1SRA Reading LabsClass generated word wallsF.M.S. and classroom librariesChild-parent selected books at home

Key Understanding:
There are different kinds of literature.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) phonics review2) long and short vowels3) proper punctuation4) proper use of capital letters5) realistic vs. fantasy, fiction vs. non fiction6) spelling through reading and writingSKILLS:1) begins to write grammatically correct sentences with proper punctuation and capital letters2) can identify different genres of literature3) can write in different styles4) can read a story orally with feeling

ASSESSMENTS
1) reading logs (Students read 15 minutes five nights a week)2) reading comprehension questions and journals3) creative writing in various modes4) oral reading (to younger children as a “Reading Buddy”)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The key element of second grade is to become far more fluent as a reader and writer.2) Much of the curriculum, therefore, is designed to encourage all students, on their own level, to become more comfortable at reading and writing.3) All students spend a significant amount of time reading in class. This is accomplished in differentiated reading groups (depending on the level of the children in the class). 4) Through use of the Reading Labs (for individuals) and the chapter books (for groups) all students progress to becoming comfortable reading.5) Through the use of writing journals and creative writing in various modalities, students become more comfortable writing. Students learn the “writing process”- brainstorming, first draft, editing, peer editing, second draft, teacher editing, final draft/ publishing. This, combined with reading, helps our students learn grammar and spelling.6) Second graders borrow specific types of books from the F.M.S. Library for book reports (e.g. biographies, fiction, etc.).7) Second graders are all “reading buddies” with kindergarten children. This gives them the opportunity to practice oral reading with expression. Students are assessed in this skill.8) Reading at home is the primary homework assignment…and is crucial for advancement in literacy.9) When possible with scheduling, children attend the performance of a professional play.
Second Grade Language Arts
2nd-3rd Trimesters

Summary: The primary objective of second graders is to become more comfortable reading and writing in English. Our program places heavy emphasis on reading and writing (with other skills being learned primarily through these two areas), critical thinking and integration with other curricular areas.
Weekly Time:Resources:*= integrated with social studies About 5.5 weekly hoursFirst Thanksgiving *Molly’s Pilgrim *A Different WorldMy Wonderful Aunt #3BaltoDinosaurs Before DarkMore Than OneAlexander Who Used to Be RichMy Wonderful Aunt #4Squanto *Make a Wish Molly *Mrs. Katz and Tush *Sam, Bands and MoonshineNicanor Knew the SecretSRA Reading LabsClass generated word wallsF.M.S. and classroom libraries Child-parent selected books at home

Key Understandings:
1) We can use strategies for being better writers.2) There is an “author’s craft” for good literature.3) We can appreciate various forms of literature.4) We need to search for what an author really means.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) examples of author’s/poet’s craft2) grammar: paragraphing, noun, punctuation, adjectives, adverbs, compound sentences,3) spelling through reading and writingSKILLS:1) expands and improves ability to write in various genres (including poetry)2) beings to analyze reading materials (including finding the main idea, inferring information and describing the genre)3) letter writing4) reading with expression5) continues to improve on writing using correct grammar and spelling

ASSESSMENTS
1) reading logs (Students read 15 minutes five nights a week)2) reading response and personal journals3) creative writing in various modes4) letter writing 5) discussing various types of literature6) using the “writing process,” writing and publishing an animal book, class poetry anthology and a fantasy book or autobiography.7) short book report projects8) oral reading (to younger children as a “Reading Buddy”)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The key element of second grade is to become far more fluent as a reader and writer.2) Much of the curriculum, therefore, is designed to encourage all students, on their own level, to become more comfortable at reading and writing.3) All students spend a significant amount of time reading in class. This is accomplished in whole group reading, as well as in differentiated reading groups (depending on the level of the children in the class). 4) Through use of the Reading Labs (for individuals) and the chapter books (for groups) all students progress to becoming comfortable reading.5) Students learn letter writing through becoming pen pals with students in a second grade of another Jewish school (in another region) as well as writing a letter to the President. Both are integrated assignments with social studies.6) The key writing assignments are writing and publishing books. Students write and publish a book about an animal (integrated with science and study skills), a class poetry anthology and a fantasy book or autobiography. Students gain more experience with the “writing process”- brainstorming, first draft, editing, peer editing, second draft, teacher editing, final draft/ publishing. This, combined with reading, helps our students learn grammar and spelling.7) Second graders borrow specific types of books from the F.M.S. Library for book reports (e.g. biographies, fiction, etc.).8) Second graders are all “reading buddies” with kindergarten children. This gives them the opportunity to practice oral reading with expression. They always read the books they publish to their “buddies,” in addition to other stories. Students are assessed in this skill.9) Reading at home is the primary homework assignment…and is crucial for advancement in literacy.


Third Grade Language Arts
Summary: By third grade, our students are expected to all be reading and writing fluently and comfortably. Students are able to read and write in various modalities. Our program places heavy emphasis on reading and writing (with other skills being learned primarily through these two areas), critical thinking and integration with other curricular areas.
Weekly Time:Resources:#=integrated with science*= integrated with social studies About 4.75 weekly hoursSelected from:Chocolate TouchStone Fox Flat StanleyRestless Earth (Berger) #Magic School Bus-Inside the Earth (J. Cole) #A Treasury of Jewish Stories (Geras) *Passage to Freedom (K. Mochizuki) *“Read alouds”:On the Wings of Eagles (Schrier)*The Never Ending Greenness (Waldman)*Aviva’s Piano (Chaikin)*Also:Daily Oral LanguageTime for Kids *

Key Understandings:
1) Reading is fun!2) Using your imagination is exciting.3) Literature lets you know how the author feels in certain situations.4) Books are used to find information
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) different genres of literature and writing (fiction vs. non-fiction)2) basic spelling and grammar rulesSKILLS:1) reading for information2) reading for understanding of plot and character3) main idea sequencing4) vocabulary development5) proper use of punctuation6) application of basic spelling rules7) using a dictionary8) self editing9) vocabulary development10) cursive writing

ASSESSMENTS
1) reading journals2) reading comprehension questions3) creative writing in various modes4) book reports5) daily edit

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) Reading and analysis of reading is one of the main activities in third grade. Books are chapter books and often integrate with other subjects. This is particularly the case with the books on Japan (second trimester) and Israel (third trimester).2) Through the use of writing journals and creative writing in various modalities, students become more comfortable writing. Students write and publish books and projects (including one’s that integrate with social studies). Students become very comfortable with the “writing process”- brainstorming, first draft, editing, peer editing, second draft, teacher editing, final draft/ publishing. This, combined with reading, helps our students learn grammar and spelling.3) Students are now able to begin learning the basic formal rules of spelling. This, along with basic grammar, is reinforced with the Daily Oral Language, as well as in the editing process.4) Students learn cursive writing in the third grade. This is the only time we teach cursive at FMS.5) Third graders borrow specific types of books from the F.M.S. Library for book reports (e.g. fiction, biography, mystery, etc.)..6) When possible with scheduling, children attend the performance of a professional play.

Fourth Grade Language Arts
Summary: By fourth grade, our students are expected to be comfortably reading to learn, as opposed to simply learning to read. They should be able to communicate their thoughts fluently both orally and in writing. Our program places heavy emphasis on reading and writing (with other skills being learned primarily through these two areas), critical thinking and integration with other curricular areas.
Weekly Time:Resources:#=integrated with science*= integrated with social studies About 4.75 weekly hoursMr. Popper’s Penguins #Beverly Cleary Short StoriesWeasal *Tall Tale Collection, selected from:John Henry, Paul Bunyon, Mike Fink, Johnny Appleseed, Daniel Boone *Letters from RikfaAlso:Daily Oral LanguageTime for Kids *Writing a Report F.M.S. Library

Key Understandings:
1) Written work has established rules.2) Dates of publication impact books’ contents.3) Authors use symbols to portray certain ideas.4) The Pioneers had entertainment…even before TV and radio.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) different genres of literature and writing (fiction vs. non-fiction fantasy vs. reality)2) basic spelling and grammar rules3) elements of report writingSKILLS:1) reading for information2) reading for understanding of plot and character3) reading to find the main idea4) ability to recognize idioms, similes and metaphors5) ability to write in complete sentences and meaningful paragraphs6) vocabulary development7) proof reading and editing8) ability to write a short report using basic research, note cards and drafts

ASSESSMENTS
1) writing journals2) writing a tall tale3) writing a short research report (using the elements noted above)- integrates with social studies and science4) teacher observations5) book report projects (including an evaluative essay)6) daily edit

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) Literature analysis is a crucial area in fourth grade. Students are not just learning to read. They are reading to learn. Students explore literature that integrates with their social studies and science themes. They are expected to read at home (about 15 minutes nightly) as well as in class.2) Students do book report projects (about five per year). These include evaluative essays and oral presentations.3) Students write in various modalities, including (but not limited to) essays, reports, stories, poems, letters, journals4) In both the second and third trimesters, students write short research reports that integrate language arts with either social studies or science. Students learn the process noted above.5) Students continue learning the basic formal rules of spelling. This, along with basic grammar, is reinforced with the Daily Oral Language, as well as in the editing process.6) Students have spelling tests every week. These are high frequency fourth grade level words pulled from literature, science and social studies.7) When possible with scheduling, children attend the performance of a professional play.


Fifth Grade Language Arts
Summary: By fifth grades, our students are very comfortable reading for information, both independently and in class. They also select age appropriate books to read for book reports. They should be able to communicate their thoughts fluently both orally and in writing. Our program places heavy emphasis on reading and writing (with other skills being learned primarily through these two areas), critical thinking and integration with other curricular areas. Because there is more social studies in fifth grade, there is less exclusively language arts time.
Weekly Time:Resources:*= integrated with social studies About 3.5 weekly hoursSelected from:Sign of the Beaver *Sarah Bishop *Johnny Tremain *Shades of Gray *Self-selected (teacher approved) books in non-fiction and science fictionAlso:Daily Oral LanguageTime for Kids *Trip to the Cleveland Plain Dealer production and distribution facility

Key Understandings:

Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) different genres of literature and writing 2) literature criticism3) vocabulary development4) differences between “fact” and “opinion”4) elements of report writingSKILLS:1) reading for information2) reading for understanding of plot and motives of characters3) literature criticism4) vocabulary development5) proof reading and editing6) ability to write a report using basic research, note cards editing and drafts (integrated with social studies)7) oral presentation skills8) writing in different genres (including creative writing, journalism, analytical writing)

ASSESSMENTS
1) writing assignments responding to plot and characters in the novel2) short answer comprehension questions3) written and oral book repots that analyze and criticize the self-selected (and teacher approved) book4) creative writing5) class newspaper6) research report (written and oral) based on the skills noted above

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) Literature analysis is a crucial area in fifth grade. Students read a variety of novels (particularly integrated with social studies) as well as self selected (but teacher approved) books for book reports.2) It is vital that, early on, students learn the difference between fact and opinion. 3) Students write in various modalities, including (but not limited to) essays, reports, stories, poems and newspaper articles. In addition, oral expression is taught through research and book reports having oral components.4) In both the second and third trimesters, students write short research reports that integrate language arts with either social studies or science. Students learn the process noted above.5) Grammar is reinforced with the Daily Oral Language, as well as in the editing process.6) Students have occasional vocabulary quizzes. These are high frequency fifth grade level words pulled from literature, science and social studies.7) When possible with scheduling, children attend the performance of a professional play.



Kindergarten Math
Resources: Bridges to Mathematics (Math Learning Center)Numerous manipulativesLibrary books (fiction and non-fiction) on money, counting, etc.

Key Understandings:
1) Calendars help us keep track of time.2) Since patterns repeat you can tell what comes next.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Number concepts2) Patterns3) Shapes4) The calendar5) Introduction to U.S. money6) Time7) Children learn what sinks and floats through water play.8) Children learn what balances and what does not, through block play.9) Children consider space and volume by seeing what happens when you pour sand from a skinny container into a tall container.SKILLS:1) counting2) introduction to calendar reading3) introduction to measurement4) reading and writing numbers at least to ten
ASSESSMENTS
Computation worksheetsMath journalsGroup and individual solving of problemsInterviews of students
Teacher Observations
LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Please see the “Bridges to Mathematics” Curriculum Guides for in-depth scope and sequence of instruction.



First Grade Math
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.5 weekly hoursBridges to Mathematics (Math Learning Center)Numerous manipulatives

Key Understandings:
1) Calendars help us keep track of time.2) Since patterns repeat you can tell what comes next.
1st Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) addition facts through ten2) introduction to graphing3) sorting4) calendar: days of week, months, year; yesterday, today and tomorrowSKILLS:1) addition computation2) subtraction computation3) introduction to graphing4) ability to sort into different categories

2nd Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) subtraction facts through 202) adding/subtracting 2 and 3 digit numbers3) addition with more than two addends4) measuring centimeters and inchesSKILLS:1) extending addition and subtraction skills2) identifying place value3) measuring objects using standard and non-standard units

3rd Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) introduction to ½ and ¼ as part of a whole2) patterns, shapes and introduction to geometry3) identifying U.S. money4) telling timeSKILLS:1) introduction to use of geometry skills2) reading time to the hour and half hour3) strengthening place value identification4) ability to find, extend and create patterns

ASSESSMENTS
Computation worksheetsMath journalsGroup and individual solving of problemsInterviews of students
Teacher Observations

LEARNING ACTIVITIESPlease see the “Bridges to Mathematics” Curriculum Guides for in-depth scope and sequence of instruction.
Second Grade Math
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.5 weekly hoursScott Forseman Addison Wessley MathNumerous manipulatives and story boards

Key Understandings:
1) We need strategies for addition and subtraction.2) Focusing on key words in story problems helps us solve the problem.
1st Trimester Knowledge and Skills
KNOWLEDGE:1) addition and subtraction facts through 202) place value to 99 3) skip counting4) odd, even and ordinal numbers5) introduction to graphingSKILLS:1) strengthening addition and subtraction computation2) strategies for addition, subtraction, story problems3) ability to read and produce simple graphs

2nd Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) two digit addition and subtraction with and without regrouping2) math strategies: doubles, neighbors, “fast 10’s,” 9’s, 8’s3) telling time4) review of U.S. moneySKILLS:1) estimating answers2) understanding two digit addition and subtraction3) solving “real life” problems4) ability to count groups of coins (review)5) ability to tell time

3rd Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) two and three digit addition and subtraction problems2) introduction to geometry & fractions3) measurement4) place value to 1,000SKILLS:1) addition and subtraction skills with hundreds, with and without regrouping2) using units of measure3) solving “real life” problems

ASSESSMENTS
Computation worksheetsMath gamesGroup and individual solving of problemsbar graphs/ pictographswriting story problems
Teacher Observations

LEARNING ACTIVITIESPlease see the “SFAW Math” Curriculum Guides for in-depth scope and sequence of instruction.
Third Grade Math
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.5 weekly hoursScott Forseman Addison Wessley MathNumerous manipulatives

Key Understandings:
1) Numbers are all around us.2) Numbers work in patterns
1st Trimester Knowledge and Skills
KNOWLEDGE:1) addition & subtraction to 4 places2) graphing review3) patterns4) “real life” problem solving5) estimate round patterns6) time reviewSKILLS:1) place value to 10,000’s2) addition and subtraction to four places (with and without regrouping) 3) review of telling time4) reading charts and graphs review5) solving “real life” problems

2nd Trimester Knowledge and Skills
KNOWLEDGE:1) multiplication and division facts2) when to use multiplication and division SKILLS:1) multiplication tables2) 1-3 digit multiplication 3) solving “real life” problems

3rd Trimester Knowledge and Skills
KNOWLEDGE:1) shapes: planes and solid figures2) symmetry3) measuring with a ruler and metric stick SKILLS:1) solving “real life” problems 2) liquid and solid measurement (U.S. and metric) and probability3) introduction to geometry4) introduction to fractions

ASSESSMENTS
Computation worksheetstestsGroup and individual solving of problemsDaily homework

LEARNING ACTIVITIESPlease see the “SFAW Math” Curriculum Guides for in-depth scope and sequence of instruction.


Fourth Grade Math
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.5 weekly hoursScott Forseman Addison Wessley MathNumerous manipulatives

1st Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) place value2) regrouping, rounding, estimating3) review of U.S. and metric measurementSKILLS:1) solving “real life” problems2) reading word problems 3) understanding units of measure4) complete comfort in addition and subtraction

2nd Trimester Knowledge and Skills:

Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) multiplication of basic facts2) double digit multiplication3) division of basic facts4) single digit long divisionSKILLS:1) solving “real life” problems2) double digit multiplication3) single digit long division

3rd Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) use of fractions2) use of decimals3) geometrySKILLS:1) solving “real life” problems2) finding equivalent fractions3) reducing fractions4) adding and subtracting fractions with like denominators5) identifying polygons6) measuring angles7) identifying place value- 10’s and 100’s

ASSESSMENTS
Computation worksheetstestsGroup and individual solving of problemsDaily homework

LEARNING ACTIVITIESPlease see the “SFAW Math” Curriculum Guides for in-depth scope and sequence of instruction.



Fifth Grade Math
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.5 weekly hoursScott Forseman Addison Wessley MathNumerous manipulatives

1st Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) operations with whole numbers and decimals2) estimation3) problem solvingSKILLS:1) solving “real life” problems2) addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers and decimals3) compare decimals and fractions4) place value5) using a calculator

2nd Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) operations with fractions and mixed numbers2) estimation3) problem solvingSKILLS:1) solving “real life” problems2) addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of fractions and mixed numbers

3rd Trimester Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) problem solving2) use of metric system 3) grams, liters, meters4) ratios, percents, probabilitySKILLS:1) solving “real life” problems2) measuring polygons3) length, perimeter, area, circumference 4) calculations of ratios and percents

ASSESSMENTS
Computation worksheetstestsGroup and individual solving of problemsDaily cumulative review

LEARNING ACTIVITIESPlease see the “SFAW Math” Curriculum Guides for in-depth scope and sequence of instruction.


Physical Education
Weekly Time:Resources: 80 minutesFMS gym, playground and fieldsOpportunities for extra physical education at mid-day center times and selected extra curricular activitiesTeacher Resources:Ways We Want Our Class to Be (Developmental Studies Center)The New Games Book (Volumes 1-2)The Cooperative Sports and Games Book (Volumes 1-2)
Key Understandings:
1) Working together is a key to success.
2) Sportsmanship is vital in sports.

SKILLS:
1) Ability to work together as a team
2) Ability to play games such as kickball, soccer, and floor hockey
3) Ability to succeed at non-competitive games requiring working together
4) Ability to: perform age appropriate exercises, jump, hop, skip, run, throw and catch a variety of balls
Assessment:
1) Observing game play (including- Can students “win” a game requiring all to work together?)
2) Observing for good sportsmanship


Kindergarten Science
Resources: Field trips to Lake Farm Park, Patterson Park apple picking, Six Flags Worlds of Adventure marine life programBlock centerWater table
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) floating vs. sinking 2) balancing3) volume and space4) seasons5) farm animals6) shadowsSKILLS:1) differentiation between sinking and floating2) identifying objects that will balance
ASSESSMENTS
Interviews of students
Teacher Observations





First Grade Science
1st Trimester
Living Things
Summary: Students will begin their study of Science through having a two trimester focus on living things.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesbig books:An Apple a Day Growing Vegetable Soup A Butterfly is Born (Newbridge)GEMS ladybug lab kitIntegrated units from the Bridges in Mathematics curriculumVideo collectionMicroscopesField trip to the Great Lakes Science Center
Key Understanding:
Living things grow, change and have needs.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Life cycles of trees2. seed disbursement3. characteristics of butterflies, ladybugs4. characteristics of insects and amphibiansSKILLS:1. Ability to describe metamorphosis2. Ability to draw an apple tree in multiple seasons3. Ability to correctly use new science vocabulary

ASSESSMENTS

Teacher ObservationsDrawingsWriting statements.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. Please consult the teacher guides for Bridges and Mathematics and the GEMS ladybugs lab kit for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.

First Grade Science
2nd Trimester
Living Things
Summary: Students continue their focus on living things. This trimester sea creatures are a particular focus.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesInsights: Living Things KitIntegrated units from the Bridges in Mathematics curriculumVideo collectionMicroscopesField trip to the Six Flags World of Adventure penguin program
Key Understanding:
Living things grow, change and have needs.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Animal characteristics 2. Review of characteristics of insects and amphibians3. Characteristics of various sea life (penguins, whales, fish)SKILLS:1. Ability to describe characteristics of various sea life studied2. Ability to describe observations of sea life3. Ability to correctly use new science vocabulary

ASSESSMENTS

Teacher ObservationsDrawingsWriting statements describing observations of sea life.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. Please consult the teacher guides for Bridges and Mathematics for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.



First Grade Science
3rd Trimester
balance and motion
Summary: Students spend this trimester studying about balance and motion, as well as improving their observation skills.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesFOSS Balance and Motion KitVideo collection
Key Understanding:
Objects can be balanced, rolled and spun.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. Concepts: balance point, counterbalance, stability2. Variables that influence spinning3. axle-disk-motion-slope-sphere, wheelSKILLS:1. Ability to find a balance point2. Ability to use counterbalances and spinners3. Ability to set up runways and roll objects up and down them4. Ability to make written observations of elementary science phenomena5. Ability to correctly use new science vocabulary

ASSESSMENTS

Teacher ObservationsDesigning a mobileWriting observations of elementary science phenomena.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. Please consult the teacher guides for the FOSS Balance and Motion kit for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.



Second Grade Science
1st Trimester
Our Body
Summary: Students will begin their study of Science through studying elements of the human body.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesNose to Toes and Broken Bones kits (Wright Group)Field trip to the Great Lakes Science Center
Key Understandings:
1. G-d has made our bodies to be wonderful and amazing.2. People have different physical traits.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:body-skin-bones-joints-organs: their functions and how they workSKILLS:1. ability to name physical traits2. ability to identify major body parts and organs3. ability to follow directions to conduct a simple experiment4. ability to make observations and record them

ASSESSMENTS

Teacher ObservationschartsWriting observation statements.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. Please consult the teacher guides of the lab kits above for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.




Second Grade Science
2nd Trimester
Animals
Summary: Students study animals an engage in guided research and writing.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesHidden AnimalsMystery MonstersClassroom and FMS library books (including encyclopedias) about various animalsTrip to the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo Rainforest
Key Understandings:
1. All animals have basic needs.2. Animals have varied habitats.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. basic needs of animals2. habitats of animals3. animal groups4. predator vs. prey5. interdependence and life cycles of plants and animalsSKILLS:1. classifying animals2. identifying attributes and needs of animals3. making inferences4. ability to make observations and record them

ASSESSMENTS

Class discussionsAnimals BooksStudents research, write, illustrate, publish and present original books on animals. They select an animal (with their teacher) to research. This is a differentiated assignment as different students are reading and writing at different levels. The culminating activity is an “author’s tea” where students present their books to their parents. This is an integrated project with our language arts and study skills curricula..

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. This trimester, students are taught about kinds of animals (their traits and habitats). They then engage in guided research and writing on a specific animal. They also have a trip to the zoo.


Second Grade Science
3rd Trimester
Matter and Plants
Summary: Students divide their trimester between a study of matter and a study of plants..
Weekly Time:Resources: About 55 weekly minutesSolids and Liquids Kit (FOSS)States of Matter Kit (Delta Science Module II)Growing Things (Insights National Science Foundation)
Key Understandings:
1. There are three states of matter…Something may change from one state of matter to another.2. Numerous factors may influence plant growth.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. the three forms of matter and how they change2. structure/ functions/relationship/parts of plants and seeds3. stages of germination/growth and variables impacting them4. interdependence and life cycles of plants and animalsSKILLS:1. ability to classify matter 2. ability to describe properties3. ability to describe physical changes4. ability to explain cause, effect and change5. ability to follow directions to conduct an experiment6. ability to make observations and record them

ASSESSMENTS

Class discussionsGrowing ThingsCan the student successfully grow a plant (and if not- explain why not)? Students attempt to grow their own plant. They record their observations and write a simple report of what happened (and why). The report should include illustrations..

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. Please consult the teacher guides of the lab kits above for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.

Third Grade Science
1st Trimester
simple machines

Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesLifting Heavy Things (Insights, National Science Foundation)
Key Understanding:
Simple machines make tasks easier.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:Identify: levers; inclined planes; pulleys; screws; wheels/axles and their interactions of force, distance and timeSKILLS:1. ability to follow directions to conduct an experiment2. ability to make observations and record them

ASSESSMENTS

Class discussionsReports of experimentsShort answer tests.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. Please consult the teacher guides of the lab kit above for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.




Third Grade Science
2nd-3rd Trimesters
geology

Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesBig Rock (Hiscock)Restless Earth (Berger)Trip to the Natural History Museum
Key Understandings:
1) Humans impact the environment.2) The earth has changed over time.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Models of different rock types2) Create and use categories to organize rocks and minerals3) Identify parts of the earth and earth’s changes SKILLS:1) Ability to identify internal and external parts of the earth2) Ability to identify changes in the earth over time3) Ability to explain cause, effect and changes.4) ability to follow directions to conduct an experiment5) ability to make observations and record them

ASSESSMENTS

Class discussionsReports of experimentsShort answer tests.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. They make their own rocks, identify types of rocks, and consider the impact of humans upon the earth.


Fourth Grade Science
1st Trimester
Weather

Weekly Time:Resources: About 1 weekly hourDelta Science Module II: Weather InstrumentsF.M.S. weather station
Key Understanding:
Lake Erie has a large impact on Ohio life.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Four elements of weather and how they change2) Weather instruments3) Concepts: Fahrenheit and Celsius scales, air pressure and barometers, wind, evaporation, humiditySKILLS:1) Ability to read weather maps2) Ability to identify and read weather instruments3) Ability to observe and describe (using appropriate vocabulary) the weather4) Ability to create simple weather instruments5) Ability to collect, graph, and report data.6) ability to make observations and record them

ASSESSMENTS

Class discussionsReports of experimentsWorksheetsScience experimentsAccuracy of reading weather instrumentsConstructing simple weather instruments

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. Please consult the teacher guide of the lab kit above for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.



Fourth Grade Science
2nd Trimester
Cells

Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesTeacher created materialsmicroscopes and micro slidesvideo collection
Key Understanding:
The cell is the basic building block of life
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Physical and chemical changes in matter2) Animal and plant cellsSKILLS:1) Ability to identify units of measure2) Ability to identify cells of plants and animals and their life functions.3) Ability to collect, graph, and report data.4) ability to make observations and record them

ASSESSMENTS

Class discussionsReports of experimentsWorksheetsScience experiments

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. They learn to collect and report on data, as well as to use basic lab equipment.

Fourth Grade Science
3rd Trimester
A Journey to Space

Weekly Time:Resources: About 1 weekly hourDelta Science Module II: Solar System video and library collection
Key Understanding:
Gravity and centrifugal force keep the earth from flying off into space.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Space and the Solar System2) Concepts: orbits, ellipses, rotation, revolution, asteroids, meteoroids, comets, light years, galaxies, universes, force, gravity and motionSKILLS:1) Ability to identify the planets in our solar system2) Ability to collect, graph, and report data.3) ability to make observations and record them

ASSESSMENTS

Class discussionsReports of experimentsWorksheetsModel or drawing of the Milky WayScience experiments

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. They learn to collect and report on data. Please consult the teacher guide of the lab kit above for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.



Fifth Grade Science

Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.7 weekly hoursOoblech Kit (GEMS- Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkley)Current Science Magazinevideo and library collectiontrip to the Water Treatment Plant
Key Understanding:
Scientists conduct experiments to find information and test theories. Sometimes this leads them to discard theories held for centuries.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1. What scientists do (and how they do it)2. Writing lab reports3. water transport and food storage in plants4. introduction to chemistry5. the systems of the human body6. health and nutrition7. the impact of drugs on the human bodySKILLS:1. Ability to write formal science lab reports2. Ability to safely conduct experiments3. Ability to identify the systems of the body4. ability to use Pro-Quest to access science articles

ASSESSMENTS
Written lab reportsClass discussionsShort essay testsCooperative summaries of current events articles on Current Science

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:Our science program focuses on a “hands on” and “minds on” approach to education. Students learn to observe and to experiment. They learn to collect and report on data. Please consult the teacher guide of the lab kit above for detailed information on learning activities that support our objectives.
Materials Include:
• Chem-2 Kit (Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkley)
• Science Explorer- Human Biology and Health (Prentice Hall)


First Grade Social Studies
1st Trimester
Our Community
Summary: Students will begin their study of Social Studies through discussing the nature of a community…and becoming one.
Weekly Time:Resources: About 45 weekly minutesScholastic NewsFor the teacher-Ways We Want Our Class to Be (Developmental Studies Center)F.M.S. library resources

Key Understandings:
1) We are part of various communities (class, school, Jewish, world)2) A community cares about its members.
Essential Questions:
1) What is a community?2) How does a community make decisions?3) If we have different ideas, how can we reach a decision everyone can accept?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE: 1) current events 2) components of successful class meetingsSKILLS:1) Ability to define “community”2) within class meetings, students will: share, plan, choose, compromise, reach consensus, assess3) ability to sing the “Star Sprangled Banner” (U.S. National Anthem)

ASSESSMENTS
Performance Assessment: A Class Name and FlagIn a series of class meetings, decide on a class name. Then design (and produce) a class flag that you will show to the Lower School and hang in your room. Remember that it is important to reach consensus.
Teacher ObservationsThe teacher will record anecdotal observations of individual’s participation in class meetings. S/he will look for: appropriate participation, willingness to share, active consensus building, respectful listening, etc.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The teacher will begin the year of social studies by discussing the concept of COMMUNITY. What is a community? What different kinds of communities are there? Of what communities are we a part?2) The teacher notes that one of our very important communities is our school community. Within that, our class is a very important community. What would it take for our class community to be a good one?3) The teacher notes that in our class, we will often have class meetings. What is a meeting? What kinds of things might we discuss in a meeting? What has to happen to succeed?4) The first thing we want to look at is ways that we want our class to be…How can we be a good community? 5) ACTIVITY: In a short series of class meetings, decide one a list of norms for the class. How do we want our class to be? In addition to generating a list, have students draw pictures of what the class looks like doing the right thing (e.g.- children playing together, children listening to a story, children working together, etc.). This becomes a gallery for students to look at and learn from—particularly in times where the class may not be meeting our (or their) expectations.6) ACTIVITY/ASSESSMENT: Now that we know how we want to be, we need a class name. Remember, what makes a successful meeting? What do we have to do? In a series of class meetings, reach consensus on a class name and then move on to making a banner.7) Teach the “Star Sprangled Banner” (which is sung weekly at School Meeting).8) Current events discussions as appropriate

First Grade Social Studies
2nd Trimester
Becoming a Community
Summary: Students will study different kinds of communities and how they make decisions. They will also study three American holidays.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: Community
Weekly Time:Resources: About 45 weekly minutesScholastic NewsFamilies in Their Neighborhoods (Everyday Learning)F.M.S. library resourcesFor the teacher-Ways We Want Our Class to Be (Developmental Studies Center)

Key Understandings:
1) A community cares about its members.2) Different people have different roles in a community.
Essential Questions:
1) Why do different people do different things in a community?2) Who is most important in a community?3) How are communities successful?4) How were George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King, Jr. important to their communities?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) current events 2) components of successful class meetings3) identification: Thanksgiving, Presidents’ Day, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Jr.SKILLS:1) continuation of improving classroom community meetings and climate2) oral explanation of key ideas

ASSESSMENTS
Assessments as per “Families in their Neighborhoods” Unit (Everyday Learning)
Teacher ObservationsThe teacher will record anecdotal observations of individual’s participation in class meetings. S/he will look for: appropriate participation, willingness to share, active consensus building, respectful listening, etc.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES: 1) Students continue to have regular class meetings to problem solve, make decisions, plan (such as a 100th day party) and assess2) Students participate in the “Families in their Neighborhoods” program from Everyday Learning. The Key understandings and essential questions will be addressed.3) As the U.S. holidays come up during the trimester, students learn their meaning and importance. In particular, they focus on the individual’s importance in the community4) Current events discussions as appropriate

First Grade Social Studies
3rd Trimester
Maps
Summary: Students learn the basics of map reading. They also continue their work in developing a class community.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: Community
Weekly Time:Resources: About 45 weekly minutesScholastic NewsU.S. and world mapsChildren’s Pictorial Atlas of the WorldF.M.S. library resourcesFor the teacher-Ways We Want Our Class to Be (Developmental Studies Center)

Key Understandings:
Maps help us find places.
Essential Questions:
1) If I want to get somewhere, what could I do?2) If I was lost, what could I do?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) current eventsSKILLS:1) continuation of improving classroom community meetings and climate2) how to read a basic map (including directions and arrows)

ASSESSMENTS
Summative Worksheet:Students are asked to label the directions on a map.Performance Assessment: Map Reading and MakingThe teacher prepares a treasure hunt for the class. There are clues in various places in school. The class is divided into two groups. Each is given a map of an area of the school. Their job is to follow the map to hunt for clues to finding a great treasure. Eventually, each group should be able to find its treasure. Once they find it, they need to make a map for the next group to find it.
Teacher ObservationsThe teacher will record anecdotal observations of individual’s participation in class meetings. S/he will look for: appropriate participation, willingness to share, active consensus building, respectful listening, etc.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES: 1) Students continue to have regular class meetings to problem solve, make decisions, plan (such as an end of the year party) and assess2) Current events discussions as appropriate3) The class learns about map reading and directions. They should be given exposure to various maps and globes. Students should be helped to find Israel, Jerusalem, the U.S., Washington D.C., Cleveland and the birth places of their teacher and classmates. Students should drill North, South, East and West until they have a very good command of the skill.4) Summative worksheet and performance assessment
Second Grade Social Studies
1st Trimester
Maps and Communities
Summary: Students learn in depth how to read maps and globes.. They also continue their work in developing a class community.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: Map reading and geography
Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesCommunities and their Needs (Silver, Burdett, Ginn)Scholastic NewsU.S. and world mapsChildren’s Pictorial Atlas of the WorldChristopher ColumbusYou Are Special (book of poetry)F.M.S. library resourcesFor the teacher-Ways We Want Our Class to Be (Developmental Studies Center)

Key Understandings:
1) Maps help us find places.2) People are different, but everyone is created special.
Essential Questions:
1) If I want to find information about a place, what do I do?2) Was Columbus a good person?3) What makes a class good?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) interests, likes, hobbies, dislikes and strengths of classmates2) names of the seven continents, four oceans and directional points, equator and prime meridian3) ColumbusSKILLS:1) reading maps and globes for information2) identification and use of directions (North, South, East, West)3) appreciation of individual differences

ASSESSMENTS
Performance Prompt: “Our Class”Once students have learned the details of reading maps for information, every student makes a map of their classroom to be used by future substitute teachers and visiting students.Performance Task: “Fire Exits”In order to review and evaluate students’ abilities to read and create maps, students will examine and analyze the possible routes of exit from their school classroom to a safe area outside the school building in the event of an actual fire preventing normal exit procedures. Student Directions:In this activity, you are going to prepare one or more maps to show the normal route of escape from your classroom, as well as possible other paths to take in the event of fire breaking out in different places around the school. Your teacher will provide some time for you and your group members to study and examine the possible places for fire to break out unexpectedly as you try to follow one particular path from your classroom. You will then use the results of your study and examination of several paths and possible places fire might surprise you to draw and label map(s) complete with a legend to show one or more safe exits from your desk in the classroom to the class' safe place for gathering outside. Your teacher will help you evaluate the effectiveness of your completed map(s) by having you switch maps with classmates from another group. They will test your map(s) by walking your proposed pathways. You or your teacher will mark the hallways with FIRE HERE signs to keep them from going through a possible danger zone. Let's hope your map was drawn and labeled clearly enough that they will know which way to turn to avoid the fire and get out safely.(from the Assessment Wizard database)Summative Worksheet:Students are asked to label a blank map with: names of the seven continents, four oceans and directional points, equator and prime meridian, the U.S., Israel
Teacher ObservationsThe teacher will record anecdotal observations of individual’s participation in class meetings. S/he will look for: appropriate participation, willingness to share, active consensus building, respectful listening, etc.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The teacher will begin the year of social studies by reviewing the concept of COMMUNITY. What is a community? What different kinds of communities are there? Of what communities are we a part?2) The teacher notes that one of our very important communities is our school community. Within that, our class is a very important community. What would it take for our class community to be a good one?3) The teacher notes that in our class, we will often have class meetings. 4) ACTIVITY: In a short series of class meetings, decide on a list of norms for the class. How do we want our class to be? In addition to generating a list, have students draw pictures of what the class looks like doing the right thing (e.g.- children playing together, children listening to a story, children working together, etc.). This becomes a gallery for students to look at and learn from—particularly in times where the class may not be meeting our (or their) expectations.5) ACTIVITY/ASSESSMENT: Now that we know how we want to be, we need a class name. Remember, what makes a successful meeting? What do we have to do? In a series of class meetings, reach consensus on a class name.6) The teacher will work on map reading and creation.7) PERFORMANCE TASK: “Fire Exits” as above8) The class will then work in-depth on map and globe reading. This is done through intensive study of geography. In particular, students should be taught to identify: names of the seven continents, four oceans and directional points, equator and prime meridian, the U.S., Israel9) The class also studies about Christopher Columbus. They should trace the route he traveled…They should also learn (without graphic detail) that though he did a brave thing, he did many evil acts in America (enslavement and killing of Native Americans). Students do need to see that he was clearly not a hero.9) SUMMATIVE WORKSHEET as above10) Current events discussions as appropriate


Second Grade Social Studies
2nd Trimester
Ways We Live
Summary: Students learn in depth how to read maps and globes.. They also continue their work in developing a class community.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: Geography and presidents
Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesCommunities and their Needs (Silver, Burdett, Ginn)Scholastic NewsU.S. and world mapsLincoln’s HatThe Courage of Sarah NobleTown and Country MouseMartin Luther King (big book)F.M.S. library resourcesFor the teacher-Ways We Want Our Class to Be (Developmental Studies Center)

Key Understandings:
1) We use map skills in daily life.2) A community is made up of people who live near each other and help one another.3) Presidents have a crucial role in governing the United States.
Essential Questions:
1) How do communities work?2) What’s the difference between a continent and a country?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Continents versus countries2) different living patterns in communities (city, suburban, rural)SKILLS:1) review of basic geography terms2) identification of elements that make up different kinds of communities

ASSESSMENTS
Summative Prompt: A Letter to You:This trimester, students are writing to “pen pals” at a Jewish school in a different region of the country (e.g.- Dallas, Seattle, San Francisco, etc.). Have students write a letter to themselves from their “pen pals” that discuss their home community. Make sure they include things that are different from what we might have in our area.


LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) We will now review the basic map skills we learned last quarter. 2) The teacher should discuss some of the differences between continents and countries. Have students look at the continents (which they know) and label some of the countries they recognize.3) We now move on to discussions of different ways of living in America. Discuss city, suburban and rural areas. How do people in those areas live? How do those communities work? Town and Country Mouse is a good read aloud book to assist in this discussion. 4) ACTIVITY: Students write “pen pal” letters two another second grade Jewish Day School class in another area of the country. They should learn about the city their “pals” live in, be able to find their city and state on a map, and learn how the lives of people in that area might differ from their lives here.5) SUMMATIVE PROMPT as above6) Students learn about the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. as well as a brief history of prejudice in the United States. They discuss what prejudice is and why it is bad. The big book is the resource for this mini-unit.7) Students learn about the Presidency (as distinct from the other branches of government). They discuss Washington and Lincoln. They read Lincoln’s Hat and write letters to our current president.8) Class meetings and current events discussions as appropriate
Second Grade Social Studies
3rd Trimester
Needs and Wants, Goods and Services
Summary: Students continue their study of geography by studying about different landforms and areas of natural resources. This leads into discussion of needs versus wants and goods versus services.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: Geography, natural resouces
Weekly Time:Resources: About 40 weekly minutesScholastic NewsU.S. and world mapsF.M.S. Library resourcesFor the teacher-Ways We Want Our Class to Be (Developmental Studies Center)

Key Understandings:
1) There are different land forms on earth.2) Communities have a variety of goods and services.3) You don’t necessarily need everything that you want.
Essential Questions:
1) How do you decide if you NEED something or only WANT it?2) How does a community decide if something is a “need” or a “want”?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) extension of geography skills through learning about cities, states, landforms, and areas of natural resources2) needs versus wants, goods versus services3) SKILLS:1) review of basic geography terms2) labeling of items as “needs” and “wants”3) labeling of items as “goods” versus “services”

ASSESSMENTS
PERFORMANCE TASK: “How is it Made” BookAfter discussing various natural resources and areas where they are found, students will create a book depicting the steps in the development of a product from a natural resource or raw material to a finished piece. They will also draw a map tracing a route for moving the finished product from the location of the natural resource to their community. The book will be bound and read to “Reading Buddies” in kindergarten. This activity integrates language arts and study skills (beginning research) with social studies. (from the Assessment Wizard Database)


LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) This trimester we will continue looking at different places in the world.2) Review continents versus countries. 3) We now are ready to study various landforms, as well as various areas of natural resources. What places have natural resources? Where are they found? How are they gotten? Can they be replaced?4) Talk about communal needs and wants. What’s the difference? What are needs and wants in our own lives? How can we get what we need? Discuss the differences between goods and services.5) PERFORMACE TASK: “How is it Made” Book as above.6) Class meetings and current events discussions as appropriate


Third Grade Social Studies
1st Trimester
Regions of the United States
Summary: Students will focus on the regions of the United States. They will consider the different lifestyles in different areas of the nations, as well as contributions of different ethnic groups. Some time will be spent reviewing the branches of government (covered in second grade)
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: United States geography, United States government
Weekly Time:Resources: About 1 weekly hourOur Country’s Geography (Steck-Vaughn)Time for KidsF.M.S. library resources

Key Understandings:
1) Many factors influence a region’s culture and economy.2) Many ethnic and social groups have impacted American life.
Essential Questions:
1) What is a good American?2) How is your life different that it might be in another state?3) If you could live anywhere in America, where would you live?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) the three branches of government (key terms: President, Vice President, Congress, Supreme Court, democracy, election, vote)2) general cultural, economic and weather patterns of the Northeast, South, Midwest, and West3) American current eventsSKILLS:1) ability to identify regions on a map2) ability to read charts and graphs for information

ASSESSMENTS
Performance Task Destination U.S.A.
Students will work in assigned cooperative groups that will act as travel agencies. After research, they will plan a vacation to one of the United States' regions. Each travel agency will present their proposed vacation for the other members of the class, who will act as the "family." Each "family" will meet and decide if they will accept the proposed vacation. (adapted from the Assessment Wizard database)


LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher should introduce the year’s social studies curriculum. S/he should discuss that we will look at three areas of the world: the U.S., Japan and Israel. In addition, much of the literature and the writing we will do this year will be about these three places.2) The teacher will briefly review how to read a map. S/he will then point out the different regions of the U.S.3) With help from the book, the students will study each of the regions. They will discuss a brief history, economy and culture.4) ACTIVITY: The students will write post cards to friends and family throughout the country to ask about life there. They will share responses with the class and keep a record of places that they’ve learned about.5) Students will take the quiz noted above. ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITY: Students who excel in geography and memorization could be asked to label a blank map of the U.S.6) LEARNING ACTIVITY: Students should write a creative diary as if they were a third grader in another region in America. It should also include pictures (drawn or collected). The students should use the “writing process” to write and publish their diaries.7) PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT: Destination U.S.A. assessment as noted above




Third Grade Social Studies
2nd Trimester
JAPAN
Summary: Students will focus on Japan through literature and social studies. In particular, they will consider Japanese environment, familial ties, the Sugihara story and Hiroshima and its aftermath.
Discipline: Language Arts. Social Studies. Subject: social studies, literature, holocaust
Topics: Japanese history and culture, literature, the Sugihara story, Hiroshima and its aftermath
Weekly Time:Resources: About 1 weekly hourA True Book: Japan, by Ann Heinrichs (Children's Press), Passage to Freedom, by Ken Mochizuki (Lee and Low Books),world mapF.M.S. library resourcesFor teacher: Culturegram on Japan
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.yadvashem.org.il/righteous
Web Link: http://www.epals.com
Web Link: http://www.us-israel.org/jsource/Holocaust/sugihara.html
Web Link:Web Link: http://www.eagleman.com/sugiharahttp://www.webjapan.com/users/chiunesugihara/
Notes: Some material from this unit is adapted from Dana Kirby's unit "Japan" in the Understanding by Design database.

Key Understandings:
1) The family is the central social unit in Japan. 2) Though Japan was a "bad guy" in World War II, individual Japanese may have been heroes or victims. 3) Environment effects the way people live and work.
Essential Questions:
1) Can you be a good person in a country run by bad people? 2) What is an environment? 3) How does the environment affect the way people live?
Knowledge and Skills:
1) key vocabulary: environment, island, resources (human, natural, capital), Shogun, emperor, visa, refugees, diplomat 2) key locations: Hiroshima, Shanghai, Tokyo, Hawaii, Pearl Harbor (Note the distance between Japan and Hawaii. On a "flat map" this can be confusing.)2) key elements of Japanese culture, industry and geography (including finding Japan on a map) 3) Japan's role in World War II

ASSESSMENTS:
Performance Task Sugihara-Righteous Among the Nations
Students will learn about Yad Vashem's designation of those who saved Jews from the Holocaust as being, "Righteous Among the Nations." In groups, they will present nominations (in writing and in an oral presentation) for Sugihara to receive this honor (In reality, he was so honored in 1984.). In addition to reviewing the social studies material in the unit, this task is intended to integrate with curricular goals in written and oral expression.
Quiz: vocabulary quiz
Students will be asked to spell and define the following words, as well as use the words in a sentence that reflects understanding of the word.: diplomatvisasenvironmentemperorShogunresources refugee
Performance Prompt: A Personal Sugihara Story
Students will be asked to write a creative piece of "historical fiction." They are to pretend that they are a child in a family that Sugihara saved and are now living in Israel. They are to write their "memoirs" of the experience. This assignment should include a draft, a peer conference, a conference with the teacher and a final draft. Volunteers will be asked to read their stories to the class.
Worksheet:
Students will complete a summative worksheet on Japanese culture and environment.


LEARNING ACTIVITIES:

UNIT INTRODUCTION:
1) The teacher will lead the class in constructing a Japan- "What I know"- "What I Would Like to Know" chart.
2) The teacher will tell the students that we are going to be studying about Japan, a very large country in Asia. In order to understand Japan better, we are not just going to talk about history, we are going to read stories, as well. In general, we will work BACKWARDS-meaning, we will start with more recent times and work our way back.
3) The teacher will locate Japan on a world map, and will note its proximity to other countries.
4) The teacher will hand out the vocabulary list and go through the words and their meanings.

SECTION ONE: World War Two and Its Aftermath
1) The teacher will briefly discuss Japanese involvement in World War II including Japanese conquest of Asia and bombing Pearl Harbor. The teacher will then discuss two other items- the Sugihara rescue of Jews and the bombing of Hiroshima. (source: A True Book: Japan, pp. 28-31 with brief worksheet) Please note that this is not intended to be a graphic discussion. Saying that, “many people died” or “six millions of our brothers and sisters were killed” is specific enough.
2) ACTIVITY: origami (source, A True Book: Japan, pp 40-41)- Students will do a sample origami for display in class.
3) LITERATURE: Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story. This book, being relatively short, will be read aloud in class with students and the teacher alternating.
4) WRITING ACTIVITY: Students will write a creative story at the end, in which they must write from the vantage point of a child whose family received a visa from Sugihara.
5) ACTIVITY: If there is a Holocaust-era survivor in the community saved by Sugihara, invite him/her in to talk to the class.
6) Vocabulary Quiz
7) PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT: Group Project- Students will prepare a nomination for Sugihara to be recognized as one of Yad Vashem's Righteous Among the Nations.

SECTION TWO: Japan's environment and culture
1) The teacher should review the location of Japan on a map.
2) The teacher should discuss the environment of Japan, and how it impacts Japanese life. (source: True Book, pp. 5-9, 11)
3) The teacher should note how Japan was "closed" to the world when ruled by the Shoguns, and how it was "opened."
4) The teacher should discuss the Japanese family and its centrality to Japanese life. (source: True Book, pp. 14-20)
5) COMPUTER ACTIVITY: Students will attempt to correspond with Japanese children through epals.com. They will try to find out more about their lives and their families. Currently, a Japanese class can be found at happygold.com/kidspark
6) WRITING ACTIVITY: The teacher will explain HAIKU- Japanese three line poems (alternating five, seven and five syllables). Students will write a haiku on the topic "My Family."
7) SUMMATIVE WORKSHEET: Students will complete a worksheet that focuses on Japanese culture and environment.

Third Grade Social Studies
3rd Trimester
THE STATE OF ISRAEL
Summary: Students will study the history of Modern Israel. They will discover its importance to Jews around the world, as well as elements of its government and culture.
Topics: Social Studies, Language Arts, Israel
Print MaterialsNeeded: Maps of Israel and the Middle East
Weekly Time:Resources: About 1 weekly hourLand of Milk and Honey Web-Book (http://www.fuchsmizrachi.org/israelbook.htm)A Treasury of Jewish Stories (ed. Gerras)Other read-aloud books integrating literature with Israeli history
Internet Resource Links
Web Link: http://www.fuchsmizrachi.org/israelbook.htm (Land of Milk and Honey Web-Book)
Web Link: http://www.israel.org (Israeli Government Web Site)
Web Link: http://www.jpost.com (Jerusalem Post Web Site)
Web Link: http://www.israelnationalnews.com (Arutz 7 Web Site)
Web Link: http://www.jajz-ed.org.il/100/people/index.html

KEY UNDERSTANDINGS:
1) Israel is a modern nation with an ancient history.2) Jews throughout the world feel a connection with Israel.3) Many kinds of Jews live in Israel. Some non-Jews do, too.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
1) Why do Jews care so much about Israel?2) Why would American Jews be interested in moving to Israel?3) What do you think it would take to live there?4) Were the early Zionists heroes?
Key Knowledge and Skills:
1) KNOWLEDGE:Students will be able to summarize how Modern Israel was created. 2) key terms: Zionism. United Nations, immigration, partitions, settlements3) Students will able to identify key personalities, including: Rav Kook, Theodore Herzl, David Ben 4) Gurion, Golda Meir, Menachem Begin5) Students will learn the basics of Israeli government, including: Knesset, Prime Minister, President6) Students will learn key elements of Israeli economy, geography and culture, as well as the Law of Return.SKILLS:1) ability to identify Israel on a world map2) ability to identify Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Beer Sheva, Hevron, and Eilat on a map of Israel.

ASSESSMENTS:
Quiz: map quiz
Students are asked to label a blank map of Israel with Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Beer Sheva, Hevron, and Eilat .
Product check: biographiesStudents are to do 2 minute oral reports on one of the following personalities: Rav Kook, Thedore Herzl, David Ben Gurion, Golda Meir, Menachem Begin. Every oral report needs to be accompanied by either a one page written report or a poster to hang in the class about the figure’s life. Web Link: http://www.jajz-ed.org.il/100/people/index.htmlPerformance Task: Come Visit IsraelStudents are to develop a tourist brochure for the Israeli Ministry of Tourism. Students should keep in mind that they want to convince people to come to Israel, while also giving them basic information on what they will see.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher introduces the study of Modern Israel by asking what students already know about Israel…and what they’d like to know.2) The major source book for this unit is Land of Milk and Honey, a web-book written by Rabbi Jablon with Polly Wilkenfeld. Access it, at home or school, through www.fuchsmizrachi.org/israelbook.htm3) The teacher notes that Israel is the ancient homeland, but also the modern homeland, of the Jewish People. Of course, Jews are connected to Israel because of the Torah and their long history. Even when Jews were exiled from the land, they always prayed to return. When Israel was created, it welcomed ALL Jews. Note the “Law of Return.” The literature book, A Treasury of Jewish Stories (ed. Gerras) integrates with this nicely.4) The teacher does map work with the class to teach key areas of Israel. S/he also compares the size of Israel to that of other nations.5) The teacher integrates the story of Israel’s creation and initial struggles with key personalities (noted above). This is a good “web quest” activity to begin teaching about research.6) ASSESSMENTS: map quiz and brief biographies7) The teacher discusses Israeli government, economy and culture with the class.8) The teacher discusses mass immigration of Sephardic Jews, the Six Day War, and the Russian immigration, as well as the struggle for survival. The “read aloud” books for this unit in language arts integrate well.9) ACTIVITY: As a class, plan and “build” an Israeli settlement. What will you need? Where will you put it? How will you live?10) SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT: Israeli tourist brochure assessment, as noted above

Fourth Grade Social Studies
1st Trimester
Ohio History: Beginnings
Summary: Students will begin learning about Ohio history.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: Ohio geography, early Ohio history
Weekly Time:Resources: About 1 weekly hourLet’s Discover OhioMaps of Ohio

Key Understandings:
1) Nearness to the equator impacts lifecycles.2) Natural resources impact culture.3) Woodlands Indians had a special culture and customs due to their home area.
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) the development of natural resources in Ohio2) customs and culture of Woodland Indians3) the importance of water sourcesSKILLS:1) reading maps and map directions (review)2) reading a narrative passage for the main idea3) using a glossary and index4) note taking

ASSESSMENTS
Performance Prompt: Native American stories
Students write original Native American tales. This is a project integrated with Language Arts designed to evaluate creative writing ability and the knowledge of Native American themes.

SUMMATIVE WORKSHEETS AND GAMES
Students engage in various worksheets and games in order to test knowledge of information studied.


LEARNING ACTIVITIES:

1) The teacher should introduce the year’s social studies curriculum. S/he finds Ohio on the American map. A discussion of what region Ohio is in is appropriate (reviews third grade, semester one)2) The teacher will briefly review how to read a map.3) With help from the book, the students will study early Ohio history, including the culture of Native Americans. The teacher should note that we will also see that culture essentially destroyed by the Pioneers.4) Summative Worksheet5) Performance prompt as above.

Fourth Grade Social Studies
2nd Trimester
Ohio History: The Pioneers and the Government
Summary: Students will continue their study of Ohio history. They will focus on the pioneer-era (and some of the ethical dilemmas this raises). Then there will be a discussion of Ohio government.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: Pioneer-era Ohio history, Ohio government
Weekly Time:Resources: About 1 weekly hourLet’s Discover OhioMaps of OhioTrip to the Western Reserve Historical SocietyPicture books of the Pioneer era

Key Understandings:
1) Pioneers played an essential part in the development of the U.S.2) In the search for land, the pioneers wiped out the Native American presence in Ohio.3) Governments provide goods and services in exchange for taxes.
Essential Questions:
1) Pioneering had costs and benefits. Was it worth it (and to whom)?2) What if nobody paid taxes?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) daily life of pioneers in Ohio2) farming and schools in pioneer-era Ohio3) the building of the State of Ohio4) the three branches of Ohio government (functions and jobs)SKILLS:1) locating historical information2) developing a short historical report

ASSESSMENTS
Written Prompt: Short Report
Students will do a short report on some aspect of pioneer-era Ohio. This integrates with bot literature and study skills.

SUMMATIVE WORKSHEETS AND GAMES
Students engage in various worksheets and games in order to test knowledge of information studied.


LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
1) The teacher discusses that we will now begin looking at pioneer-era life in Ohio. S/he mentions the essential questions and key understandings. This is important as it begins to give importance to our study.2) With help from the book, the teacher teaches about pioneer life in Ohio. Please remember to focus on the essential question of whether this was all worth it (and to whom).3) The students experience “Pioneer Days,” a series of experiential activities designed to give students a small taste of pioneer life.4) Written prompt (report) as above.5) Summative worksheets and games as above.6) We now move on the a brief discussion of how government works, with particular attention to the three branches and the role of taxation.7) Summative worksheets and games as above.8) ACTIVITY: write a letter to the Governor or an Ohio State Senator about an important issue facing Ohio today.





Fourth Grade Social Studies
3rd Trimester
Ohio History: The Jewish Role
Summary: Students will continue their study of Ohio history. They will focus on the role of Jews in Cleveland history. They will also consider the Jewish immigrant experience.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: Cleveland history, Jewish American history, immigration
Weekly Time:Resources: About 1 weekly hourLet’s Discover OhioMaps of OhioResources on Miriam Sora Gold (from Historical Society)Picture books of the immigrant era

Key Understandings:
1) Jewish immigrants helped shape Cleveland history.2) The immigrant experience helped shape American Jewish life.
Essential Questions:
1) Why would Jews want to come to America?2) Why would Jews want to come to Cleveland?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) comparing and contrasting immigrant groups2) contributions of German-Jewish immigrants3) life for Eastern European Jews, 1880-19204) contribution of Eastern European Jews in AmericaSKILLS:1) evaluating primary sources2) locating historical information3) developing a short historical report

ASSESSMENTS
IF TIME IS AVAILABLE: Written Prompt: Short Report
Students will do a short report on some aspect of Jewish immigrant life. This report will include at least one primary source. Reports on families (their own or people they know) and congregations are encouraged. This integrates with language arts and social studies.

SUMMATIVE WORKSHEETS AND GAMES
Students engage in various worksheets and games in order to test knowledge of information studied.


LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The teacher introduces the trimester topic as Jewish immigration to America and Cleveland. Students are asked to find out where their family comes from.2) The teacher traces two distinct groups of Jewish immigrants- German Jews and Eastern European Jews. S/he discusses their lives in Europe, motivations for coming and contributions
once here. 3) WRITTEN PROMPT AND SUMMATIVE WORKSHEETS AS ABOVE
Fifth Grade Social Studies
1st Trimester
Early American History
Summary: Students will begin their study of American History by looking at the early history of the continent.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: United States geography, United States government
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.7 weekly hoursThe United States: Yesterday and Today (Silver Burdett-Gin)News of the Nation-ExplorersU.S. History NewspaperU.S. and world mapsTime for Kids

Key Understandings:
1) The history of America began thousands of years ago with Native Americans, and was only later influenced by European culture through settlers and explorers.2) The “settlement” of America came with a large cost to the native population.3) The Pilgrims came for freedom of religion…But it was for themselves, not others.
Essential Questions:
1) How would you find your way from one end of the world to another? How did the Explorers?2) Was the “settlement” of America worth it (and to whom)?3) Why would British citizens want to come to the “New World”?4) What did freedom of religion mean to the Pilgrims? What does it mean to us?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) Native American history2) The early explorers of North America3) The Colonial Period4) Current eventsSKILLS:1) map reading (including longitude and latitude)2) evaluating primary sources3) locating historical information4) developing a short historical report

ASSESSMENTS
Summative Evaluation: Map Quiz
Students will complete a two part map quiz. One part is labeling a blank map with the places we are studying (North America, Europe, Atlantic Ocean, England, France, Spain, Holland). The second part is on a filled in map to be identify cities when given longitudes and latitudes.

Written Prompt: Short Report
Students will do a short report on a Native American tribe. This report will include at least one primary source. Reports should have both a written and oral component. The oral component, as well as the research, may be a group project. This integrates with language arts and social studies.

Written Prompt: A Letter Home
At the conclusion of the trimester, students will write “a letter home to England.” Half of the class are colonists in Massachusetts. Half are colonists in Rhode Island. They will write home a 1-2 page letter telling their brother or sister why they came to America and what they are experiencing. Final drafts are read to the class.


LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The teacher will introduce the year’s topic in Social Studies. S/he will point out that this is the first time that Social Studies will be a “full” course in Lower School. Together, we will study topics in American history. We will learn a great deal about the development of the U.S. as the world’s greatest democracy. First, though, we will learn about early America. (Current events will be covered about 20-30 minutes per week. Time for Kids, or articles from other publications, may be assigned as homework to read articles in advance of current events discussions.)2) First, we need to review maps…and add a new element to our map reading. The teacher teaches longitude and latitude. Then, s/he points out various places that will appear in our studies in the next few weeks.3) MAP QUIZ4) With help from the text, we learn about some of the Native American tribes in America prior to the arrival of European settlers. 5) SHORT REPORT as above6) The class now focuses on the early explorers. The News of the Nation series is designed to give students brief exposure to various explorers. This work can be done independently or in groups. Assessments are objectives questions within the packets.7) The class is now ready to cover the Colonial Period. The text will be a helpful resource. Students should understand why British citizens came here. Please pay particular attention to the key understandings and essential questions. Note that freedom of religion meant something very different pre-Bill of Rights than post-Bill of Rights.8) SUMMATIVE PEFORMANCE PROMPT: a letter home to England as above


Fifth Grade Social Studies
2nd Trimester
The Formation of American Democracy
Summary: Students will study the Revolutionary War and the formation of the Constitution and Bill of Rights. This is a vital study of the centerpiece of democracy.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: United States geography, United States government
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.7 weekly hoursThe United States: Yesterday and Today (Silver Burdett-Gin)U.S. History NewspaperU.S. and world mapsTime for KidsFor the teacher:Past-Ports: Roots of Freedom (Demco)

Key Understandings:
1) The Revolutionary War was fought over “taxation without representation.”2) The Constitution and Bill of Rights are landmark ideals in human history…even if the U.S. didn’t always live up to its ideals.
Essential Questions:
1) Did the Colonists really have a right to be represented?2) Did the “Founding Fathers” believe that all men are created equal?3) How was the Constitution and Bill of Rights a new idea in history?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) the causes and results of the Revolutionary War2) the content and importance of the Declaration of Independence3) the content and importance of the Constitution4) the role of American Jews in the Revolution5) key figures: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Haym Solomon, Mordecai ShefftalSKILLS:1) evaluating primary sources2) locating historical information3) critical thinking4) oral argumentation

ASSESSMENTS
Summative Evaluation: Essay Test Students will take an essay examination on the Revolution and Constitution. They will have the essays in advance. The questions should be drawn from the essential questions above.
Performance Task: The Constitution DebateStudents are assigned to represent states in the Constitution Debate. They are to research what their states would have wanted to achieve at the Constitutional Convention. As a class, they need to write a new constitution for the U.S. Students receive two grades. One grade is for how accurately they represent their state and how well they present their arguments. The second grade is shared by the entire class and is to reflect the quality of the constitution they develop. NOTE: As this is a high level task, you may wish to limit what they have to write (e.g.- the form of government, a Bill of Rights, slavery, etc.)
Constitution Quiz:Students take a quiz on the content of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The teacher will note that we are now going to see the foundations of American (and indeed world) democracy. We are going to focus on the Revolutionary War and the Constitution. The Demco “Past Ports” series (with its component activities) should be used to supplement this unit.2) The teacher discusses the concept of “Taxation Without Representation,” as opposed to the British view of “Virtual Representation.” Some taxes, such as the “Tea Tax” should be discussed. The text can assist with readings about what lead up to the Revolutionary War.3) We now discuss the Declaration of Independence. Students should fully read, discuss and understand the document (including the apparent issue of “All men are created equal.” 4) The Revolutionary War and aftermath can be discussed using the text and maps of the original thirteen states.4) The Constitution is studied in depth. We look at what lead to it, the issues at the 5) Constitutional Convention, and the document (along with the Bill of Rights). Depending on the sophistication of the class (and their ability to do research before the material is taught), the performance task above can be used either at the beginning or end of the unit.6) The Essay Test and Constitution quiz are summative evaluations for this unit.




Fifth Grade Social Studies
3rd Trimester
The Civil War and Its Aftermath
Summary: Students will study the causes and effects of the Civil War. They will also spend time on post-war immigration and the presidency of Ohioan James Garfield.
Discipline: Social Studies. Subject: social studies
Topics: United States history
Weekly Time:Resources: About 2.7 weekly hoursThe United States: Yesterday and Today (Silver Burdett-Gin)U.S. History NewspaperU.S. and world mapsTime for KidsField trip to President Garfield’s home (Mentor, Ohio)

Key Understandings:
1) Slavery was only one cause of the Civil War.2) States rights was a key issue in the Civil War (and American history in general).3) Jews viewed America as the “Golden Land.”
Essential Questions:
1) What were the causes of the Civil War?2) Which side in the Civil War was “right”? 3) What if the South had abolished slavery—and then seceded?4) Why would Jews come to America?
Knowledge and Skills:
KNOWLEDGE:1) the causes and effects of the Civil War2) the 13th amendment3) key terms: slavery, state’s rights, secession, Union, Confederate, reconstruction4) key people: Lincoln, Davis, Grant, Lee5) Jews in the Civil War (including the Paducah incident and General Orders #11)6) Immigration of the 1880’s7) President James GarfieldSKILLS:1) evaluating primary sources2) locating historical information3) critical thinking4) seeing different perspectives

ASSESSMENTS
Performance Task: U.S. History News
Directions for students: You are writing a U.S. History newspaper. You are trying to give your readers a feeling for what was happening in America in 1861. Develop a newspaper published in St. Louis. Write editorials both in favor and against secession. Students can also include artwork and other articles of interest showing knowledge of the period (though the key here is understanding both sides of the arguments). Students should work in groups, though everyone should sign at least one editorial.
Summative Evaluation: Essay Test Students will take an essay examination on the causes and effects of the Civil War. They will have the essays in advance. The questions should be drawn from the essential questions above.
Written Prompt: A Letter Home
At the conclusion of the trimester, students will write “a letter home to Russia.” They have immigrated to America in 1881 and write home to their parents. They need to tell their parents about their life in America (economically, religiously, socially, educationally, etc.).

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:1) The teacher notes that we are going to begin talking about the Civil War. This was the most costly war in American history, and literally pitted brother against brother. We will learn what the war was about, as well as what happened and what it caused.2) On a map, show the difference between North and South. Discuss the different lifestyles in each area. Discuss slavery as a- though not the only- issue in the conflict. The text should be helpful.3) The teacher should explain the concept of “States’ Rights” and how this impacted debates over slavery and taxation.4) Discuss secession- what it means, and why the North opposed it.5) PERFORMANCE TASK: U.S. History News6) Discuss the progress of the Civil War. The text should be helpful.7) Discuss the results of the war. Discuss the Thirteenth Amendment and reconstruction (and that this did not make African Americans “equal” Note that African Americans would have to struggle well over a century for a measure of equality.).8) SUMMATIVE EVALUATION: essay test on the Civil War9) Discuss briefly the period of 1865-1881. Discuss President Garfield (as we’ll visit his house).10) The discussion now shifts to immigration. Talk about the Southern Italian and the Eastern European Jewish immigrations. Why did they come? What was life like when they were here?11) ACTIVITY: Have students develop a family tree (based on where their families came from). Ask students why their families came to America. If they don’t know specific stories, ask them- given what was happening in the “old country”- why their ancestors may have come.12) WRITTEN PROMPT: A Letter Home (as above)



Social Skills Curriculum
Resources: Ways We Want our Class to Be (Developmental Studies Center)Bully-Proofing Your School (Sopris West)The New Games Book (vols. 1-2)The Cooperative Sports Book (vols. 1-2)Beyond Discipline (Alfie Kohn)School counselor (5-6 scheduled class sessions during the year, plus other individual and group meetings- as well as consultations with teachers- as needed)Weekly Lower School Community Meeting

Key Understandings (throughout Lower School):1. “Love your neighbor as yourself.”2. We want every child to be happy and safe (physically and emotionally) in school.3. Every person is unique, special and has intrinsic value as having been created in G-d’s image.4. The Torah gives us role models of how to teat others.5. Everyone’s educated opinion is of value.6. We need to treat everyone with respect and kindness.7. There are strategies to solve problems.8. It is important to work cooperatively and as a team.9. Everyone has something they can contribute to help a community, a project and/or their fellow person.10. People can work together to share and support one another as they try to attain success.KINDERGARTEN SKILLS1) sharing2) creating and following basic rules3) taking turns4) developing a language of feelings5) separation6) interpersonal problem solvingFIRST GRADE SKILLS
1) Defining examples of Mitzvot Ben Adam l’Chavero 2) Transitioning to the first grade3) Separation from parents4) participation in class meetings (various formats)5) participation in cooperative games6) sharing feelings and empathy7) taking individual initiative8) respecting other’s opinions9) including others in the group10) listening to others11) “bully proofing”
SECOND GRADE SKILLS
1) successful participation in various kinds of class meetings2) developing appropriate and meaningful relationships with adults at school3) expressing opinions in a polite way4) understanding and appropriately expressing their feelings5) being a good friend6) playing cooperative sports7) engaging in group work and activities8) analyzing problems and using “tools” and strategies to solve them9) ability to serve as a “reading buddy” for younger children
THIRD GRADE SKILLS
1) ability to work as partners and not in competition2) friends as individuals and groups- inclusion issues3) understanding and appropriately expressing feelings4) differences between cliques, groups, and clubs5) being able to serve as a “reading buddy” to a first grader6) ability to play cooperative sports and games7) ability to raise issues of concern and disagreement respectfully, honestly and appropriately with adults
FOURTH GRADE SKILLS
1) ability to include others in a group2) ability to understand and appropriate express feelings in order to begin to engage in conflict resolution3) ability to successfully play cooperative sports and games4) ability to properly listen 5) ability to complete a cooperative project6) ability to exhibit positive traits of a good neighbor7) ability to raise issues of concern and disagreement respectfully, honestly and appropriately with adults8) ability to apply the lessons of Pirke Avot to our own interpersonal relationships9) ability to “stand up” for others
FIFTH GRADE SKILLS
1) adjusting to greater academic demands2) adolescence: dealing with changes from an integrated religious, emotional and scientific view3) ability to work together as a group to succeed in a graded project4) ability to respect others with differing opinions and talents5) ability to respectfully evaluate the opinions and performances of others6) ability to understand and appropriate express feelings in order to engage in conflict resolution7) ability to raise issues of concern and disagreement respectfully, honestly and appropriately with adults
Assessments(throughout Lower School):
1) group work
2) group play and cooperative sports
3) Can the students reach consensus?
4) Can students “win” a game requiring everyone to work together?
5) Teacher observations of class meetings, games and reading buddies programs
6) Role playing
7) Ability to connect their study of Torah to their social skills at school and home
8) Skills of independence and self awareness in a Torah framework

Learning Activities(throughout Lower School):
Every class has 5-6 half hour sessions with the school counselor scheduled during the year (normally on Friday afternoons in the fall and spring). These sessions are used to discuss key topics in the curriculum that we feel are developmentally appropriate at each level, as well as other class issues that arise. In addition, the following activities are used throughout the curriculum to support the goals of our program.:
1) cooperative learning (including on graded projects)
2) class meetings (including: creating classroom norms, selecting a name, designing and making a banner, problem solving, evaluation)
3) cooperative games
4) serving as “reading buddies” for younger children
5) weekly participation in the Lower School Community Meeting
6) individual or additional group meetings, as needed, with the school counselor
7) This program integrates with our Torah Studies curriculum (including Dinim and Mishna-Pirke Avot)
Study Skills Curriculum


SECOND GRADE SKILLS
1) organizing papers and homework2) keeping an organized homework folder3) turning in homework on time4) proper care of desk supplies5) organizing steps and materials in a project or activity


THIRD GRADE SKILLS
1) proper use of an assignment notebook2) long range planning for long term assignments (using an assignment notebook)3) finding a time and place for homework4) use of flashcards for Hebrew vocabulary
FOURTH GRADE SKILLS
1) using a dictionary (both English and Hebrew-English)2) using an encyclopedia to find information3) using a table of contents and index to locate information4) using an almanac to find information5) using a thesaurus6) using note cards to prepare a three paragraph research paper7) ability to locate needed resources in the library

FIFTH GRADE SKILLS
1) researching, compiling and organizing data in groups and independently2) how to write a science lab report3) how to research information for a social studies report4) ability to locate needed resources in the library and on the World Wide Web

Learning Activities:
Within all aspects of our academic programs, it is vital for students to have direct instruction in the areas of study skills. The areas above need direct instruction, as well as monitoring by teachers. Teachers will need to check homework folders, assignment books, note cards, etc. Please consult the specific academic programs for projects that will correspond to these skills.

Both the library and computer lab are vital resources for our study skills program.

 

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