Lihitraot Lot! Avraham and Lot Separate, Part 1

  • 40 minutes
  • Grades: 2-3
  • Lesson Plan
  • by: Semadar Goldstein

Lesson plan on Bereshit 13:5-11. After studying the text, students act out the separation of Avram and Lot as described in the text. Students also learn roots of common Biblical words.

Introduction

In this lesson plan on Bereshit 13:5-11, students study the text in preparation for acting out the texts’ events in the next lesson.

Lesson objectives

The student will be able to:
1. Describe how the shepherds of Avram and Lot were fighting.
2. Describe how each shepherd felt his cattle did not have enough land on which to graze.
3. Relate how Avram expressed concern about family fights and offered a compromise.
4. Explain that Lot decided to choose a direction to travel, and Avram chose the opposite way.
5. Describe how Lot chose Jordan, towards Sodom. Avram made his way toward Canaan. They separated.

Skills

The student will be able to:
1. Identify a list of common Biblical vocabulary. (See list)

Resources & Equipment needed

Vocabulary binder/workbook, blackboard, highlighter, pens/pencil

Vocabulary list
1. לשבת
2. ריב
3. הפרד
4. אחים
5. שמאל
6. אימנה

Procedure

1.Teacher Preparation (before class): Find students to act in skit; review script with them (see script below). A word on skits: Introduce three well reading students to script a few minutes before class starts. Tell them you would like them to perform for the class if they can read well and behave. Most children love to perform, so this should not be a problem. Once other students see a skit, many might ask to participate. A chart can be kept in the classroom of ‘skit performances’ to rotate turns. As skits are incorporated into the class, students can be rewarded with extra performances based on their behavior during other people’s performances. Blackboard setup: In large letters, on top middle of blackboard “Lihitraot Lot!” and copy the following words onto the right side of the board. In the space remaining, draw the scene as described in the Humash. On the left , draw a sheep, cow, tent and a shepherd. On the right, draw a sheep, cow, tent and a shepherd. The shepherds should be facing each other with angry expressions on their faces. Label one group רועי לוט and the other,

רועי אברם. 2. Trigger: Skit – children playing in sandbox. Jakie: You’re taking up all the space in the sandbox! Eliot: Well I want to sit here, too! Jakie: You can’t have it all. Eliot: Well neither can you! Look – all my sand toys need to be here. Jakie: There’s no more room. (look angry at each other) Eliot: Why don’t you move? Jakie; Why don’t you? Eliot’s mom (can be played by teacher) steps in: Boys, don’t fight. You’re cousins! There’s plenty of room for both of you. Look at how big this sandbox is! Why don’t you separate? One of you go to the right (pointing) and one of you to the left (point the other way). Jakie – you choose first – where would you like to go? Jake (pausing, looks up and points): There! Eliot (looks up and nods): OK, then I’ll play over there. (Pointing in a different direction)

3. Check student comprehension by asking the students what the children were fighting about (not enough room in the sandbox) and how did they resolve the issue (separating and playing on opposite sides). 4. Students should copy the vocabulary list into their notebooks.While students are finishing (circulate the room to make sure majority are done), say: You are going to see the skit again. This time, 5 words will be said in Hebrew. When you hear them, think of its meaning in English. When the skit is done, I will ask you each word’s definition and we will write it down.

4. Skit with Hebrew vocabulary Jakie: You’re taking up all the space in the sandbox! Eliot: Well I want לשבתhere, too! Jakie: You can’t have it all. Eliot: Well neither can you! Look – all my sand toys need to be here. Jakie: There’s no more room. (angry looks abound) Eliot: Why don’t you move? Jakie; Why don’t you? Eliot’s mom (can be played by teacher) steps in: Boys, לא לריב! You’re cousins! There’s plenty of room for both of you. Look at how big this sandbox is! Why don’t you תפרדו? One of you go to ימין (pointing) and one of you to שמאל (point the other way). Jakie – you choose first – where would you like to go? Jake (looks up and points): There! Eliot (looks up and nods): OK, then I’ll take over there (Pointing in a different direction). 5

. Check student comprehension by asking the students what they thought words meant and how they got that impression. Students shoul write down the meanings of the words. Discuss how the word אחים could mean a relative.

6. Textual reading – Tell students you will read text, and they should highlight words or underline words used in the skit. Read with expression. Review highlighted/underlined words after reading. (Highlighting aHumash is a system that works for some, while others disagree claiming disrespect of the book. Use a light pencil underneath the word to keep them paying close attention if highlighting is not preferred).

7. Read the text again, acting out phrases or using board pictures of sheep and shepherd, and angry faces.

8. Check for comprehension through questioning. Ask: Which groups of people were fighting? (shepherds of Lot vs. shepherds of Avram) In what verse does the Torah say the shepherds are fighting? (verse 7) Who wanted to separate – Avram or Lot? (Avram) What words does the Torah use to say this. Look in verse 8. (אל נא תהי מריבה ביני וביניך) What reason does Avram give for not fighting? (We are ‘brothers’ = relatives, כי אחים אנחנו) In which verse is this stated? (verse 8)

9. Clarify other difficult words or concept students don’t understand.(Note: tell students to skip end of verse 10 after the word משקהuntil the end. Go right to verse 11.)

10. Student Reading/Acting in Front of Class. Choose 2 students whom you feel understand the text well and have them act out the verses as they, or you, read. In verse seven they can ad-lib a bit, by including what they think Avram and Lot said to each other during the fight ( ‘there’s no more room here for your sheep!’ or ‘your cow is eating my cow’s grass!’, etc.)

Appendices

Related Lessons

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