Below is a collection of High Holidays lesson plans, videos, and articles created by The Lookstein Center staff or contributed to the site by Jewish educators.  

 

Rosh Hashanah Overview:

  • What? Rosh Hashanah, literally meaning “head [of] the year”, is the Jewish New Year. The biblical name for this holiday is Yom Teruah, literally “day of shouting or blasting (of the shofar).”
  • When? Rosh Hashanah takes place on the first and second days of the Jewish month of Tishrei. The first of Tishrei marks the beginning of the ten-day period known as the Aseret Yemei Teshuvah (the ten days of repentance), which is marked by acts and prayers focused on repentance and forgiveness, and culminates on Yom Kippur.
  • How? Rosh Hashanah is celebrated by blowing the shofar, special prayer services, and festive meals which include a series of symbolic foods (simanim).

Yom Kippur Overview:

  • What? Yom Kippur, meaning the day of atonement, is a day of fasting and repentance that is considered to be the holiest day in the Jewish calendar. 
  • When? Yom Kippur takes place on the tenth day of the Jewish month of Tishrei, the culmination point of the Aseret Yemei Teshuvah.  
  • How? Yom Kippur is a fast day, with five total restrictions (known as inuyim): refraining from eating, drinking, washing, sexual relations, and wearing leather. The day is focused largely on prayer and asking for forgiveness. There is a widespread custom to wear white clothing on Yom Kippur, to symbolize the purity we hope to achieve.
High Holidays Vocabulary
 

English Transliteration

Translation

Hebrew

Teshuvah

Repentance

תשובה

Tefillah

Prayer

תפילה

Tzedakah

Charity

צדקה

Tashlich

The ritual act of “casting away our sins” that is traditionally performed between the holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur

תשליך

Simanim

Traditional symbolic foods that are eaten as part of the festive meal on Rosh Hashanah

סימנים

Shofar A ram’s horn which is blown on Rosh Hashanah, as a “wake up call” to better oneself שופר
Teruah One of the shofar blast sounds, typically nine short blasts תרועה
Tekiah One of the shofar blast sounds, typically one long blast תקיעה
Shevarim One of the shofar blast sounds, typically three medium-length blasts שברים
Selichot Prayers and poems which focus on the theme of forgiveness and atonement, which are traditionally said starting from the Jewish month of Elul and culminating in Yom Kippur’s prayers סליחות
Yamim Noraim High Holidays (literally translated as “Days of Awe”) ימים נוראים
Aseret Yemei Teshuvah The Ten Days of Repentance (beginning with the first day of Rosh Hashanah on the first day of the Jewish month of Tishrei and culminating in Yom Kippur, the tenth day of the Jewish month of Tishrei) עשרת ימי תשובה
Inuyim Restrictions for the day of Yom Kippur (which include no eating, no drinking, no sexual relations, no washing, and no wearing leather) עינויים
Tzom Fast Day צום
Sefer Yonah The Book of Jonah, traditionally read on Yom Kippur due to its themes of repentance and forgiveness ספר יונה
High Holidays Educational Themes
  • Apologies and forgiveness
  • Renewal
  • Introspection and personal reflection
  • Prayer and connection to God
  • Responsibility
  • Accountability
  • Justice and mercy

**Need lessons for virtual sessions? Look for the  💻  icon below. **

LESSON PLANS AND ARTICLES

💻 Rosh Hashanah Simanim Padlet –This interactive, collaborative digital activity reviews the symbolic foods eaten on Rosh Hashanah and their meanings and includes instructions for adaptions for both elementary and middle school students. From The Lookstein Center.
💻 Yom Kippur Tefillah: A Discussion Guide – This lesson for middle and high school students explores common feelings that are felt by children (and adults) during Yom Kippur davening in an open and non-judgmental way. From The Lookstein Center.
💻 Teshuvah: A Discussion GuideThis lesson explores the Jewish approach to repentance, drawing on Rambam’s Hilchot Teshuvah. Included are hands-on activities for younger and older students that deal with guilt and apology. From The Lookstein Center.
Sefer Yonah – This three-part lesson plan for high school students explores the argument between Yonah and God. From The Lookstein Center.
High Holidays Classroom Activities – These classroom activities and discussion points for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur can contribute to lessons elementary through high school. From the Jewish Agency.
Rosh Hashanah Family Activities – These resources include stories, blessings, crafts, and more for children of all ages. From Reform Judaism.
Everything You Need to Teach Your Kids About Rosh Hashanah – This resource guide from PJ Library contains general information, videos, recipes, arts and crafts projects, book recommendations, and more for young children.
Yom Kippur 101 – This article from MyJewishLearning explores the history, customs, and theologies of Yom Kippur.
Rosh Hashanah Articles – These resources from the Orthodox Union include basic and advanced articles, audio lectures, and video lectures on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

 

VIDEOS AND SONGS

Rosh Hashannah Videos for Kids: – These short videos from Chabad.org teach young students about Rosh Hashanah customs and traditions.
High Holidays Videos – These educational videos from Aish explore the themes of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.
What is Rosh Hashanah? The Jewish New Year – This video from Bimbam reviews holiday themes and traditions.
The Rosh Hashanah Special – This video from Shaboom teaches values of teshuvah and forgiveness to young children.
Four Things Jews Do On Rosh Hashanah – This video from Mayim Bialik shares some important holiday traditions.
Starting Over: A Song for Rosh Hashanah – This song from Six13 discusses themes of teshuvah.
This is the New Year: – This song from the Maccabeats explores High Holiday themes.
High Holy Days – These videos from Shalom Sesame teach young children about Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.
What is Yom Kippur? – This video from Vimbam reviews holiday themes and traditions.
Yom Kippur: Book of Jonah – This video explains the story of Jonah through song.


Do you have anything to add to this list? Contact content@lookstein.org