Jewish Studies Curriculum – Columbus Torah Academy

THREE TRACK CURRICULUM FOR JUDAIC STUDIES – A PILOT PROGRAM

Students are selected for each track based on previous academic records, a personal interview with a designated member of the Torah staff, and a consultation with parents.
CTA offers three options within its Judaic program:
1. THE “KOLLEL” PROGRAM – the goal of this program is to produce Talmedei chochamim, scholars of Torah, who are able to translate and analyze original Hebrew text, and to enter advanced Yeshivot in Israel and America. This rigorous curriculum requires a high level of interest and motivation, extended class hours, as well as a willingness to spend time outside of the classroom in text analysis and preparation. The Kollel program for boys consists of five Judaic class hours, consisting of at least two hours daily of Talmud, one hour of Bible, one hour of Jewish Law, Philosophy, Ethics, and Liturgy 2-3 days per week each taught during the regular school day. Two classes of Hebrew Language per week and two classes of chavruta learning are required between 4:15 and 5:00 Monday through Thursday. The Kollel learning day for boys ends at 5 p.m. The Kollel program for girls features two hours of Bible, one hour of Talmud, one hour of Jewish Law, Philosophy, Ethics, and Liturgy taught 2-3 days per week each, and two classes of Hebrew Language per week from 4:15-5 p.m. The Kollel learning day for girls ends at 5 p.m.two days per week.
COURSE OFFERINGS
MISHNA/TALMUD/TORAH SHEH-BA-AL PEH
Talmud 6100 – Freshman
The Logic of the Talmud. Emphasis is placed on developing textual facility with an emphasis on fluency in reading Rashi and on a certain familiarity with key vocabulary words and phrases. An emphasis will also be placed on understanding hermeneutic rules of interpretation such as the analogy, the inference from minor to major, explanations from the context, deductive and inductive methods. Selected readings from the Talmud Orders of Zeraim and Moed.
Talmud 6200 – Sophomore
The Festivals. An analysis of regulations pertaining to observance of festivals. A study in methods of interpretation and interrelationships of subject matter. Emphasis will be placed on attaining fluency in reading and translating the text of the Talmud and Rashi. Selected readings from Moed.
Talmud 6300 – Junior
Civil and Criminal Law. Intensive analysis of civil and criminal law based upon Talmudic law. A comparative evaluation of the standard commentaries on the Talmud such as Rashi and Tosafot. Selected readings in the Talmud. Special consideration is also given to jurisdiction in ancient Israel, the Jewish court of justice, its character, division and representatives. Selected readings from Nezikin.
Talmud 6400 – Senior
Marriage and Divorce. Intensive analysis of the laws of marriage and divorce, using the commentaries of Rashi, Tosafot, Maimonides, Alfasi, and Asher B. Yehiel. Selected readings from Nashim.
BIBLE
Bible 6100 – one semester
The Book of Numbers. A detailed analysis of the wanderings of the Jews in the wilderness of Sinai and their ethical import
Bible 6200 – one semester
The Book of Deuteronomy. A summary of Torah law as gleaned from this last book of the Pentateuch, and a stylistic and theological analysis of Moses’ last words to the people Israel.
Bible 6300 – year-long
The Book of Genesis. An intensive study of the Book of Genesis together with classical Jewish commentaries. Textual skills are stressed. Central topics covered include the Torah view of evolution, the nature of marriage, the mission of the patriarchs and matriarchs.
Bible 6400 – year-long
The Book of Exodus. Emphasis is placed on the contrasting trends of slavery and freedom and a thorough discussion of what took place at Sinai. The definition of miracles is also considered.
Bible 6500 – year-long
The Book of Leviticus. An in-depth study of the priesthood and the nature of holiness.
Bible 6600 – offered periodically based upon administrative discretion. Selected Topics in the Five Books of the Torah
JEWISH LAW, PHILOSOPHY, ETHICS AND LITURGY
Jewish Law 6422 (one semester)
Jewish Law Survey. Overview of Jewish law pertaining to daily practices (blessings, general conduct, dietary laws, and prayers). Texts include Kitzur Shulchan Aruch of Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried, Shulchan Aruch of Rabbi Yosef Karo, Laws of Shabbat by Rabbi Shimon Eider, Mishna Berura by Rabbi Yisroel Mayer Kagan.
Jewish Law 6432 (one semester)
Applied Jewish Law. Modern applications of Jewish law in the area of Sabbath and Holidays, from selected portions of Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim, with commentary of the Mishna Berura and Shmiras Shabbos K’hilchaso by Rabbi Y. Neuwirth.
Jewish Law 6442 (one semester)
The Minor Festivals. Laws pertaining to minor festivals of Chanukah and Purim, Fast Days, the Three Weeks, mourning for the Temple, and laws pertaining to the Land of Israel. Special units deal with honoring parents, relationships between Jews and their fellowmen, birth, circumcision, bar/bat mitzvah, pidyon ha-ben, death, and mourning.
Prophets 6322 (one semester)
The Early Prophets, Samuel I and II. An in-depth study of the Early Prophets and their historical setting through the eyes of Shmuel HaNavi.
Prophets 6332 (one semester)
Kings I and II. A historical overview of the first commonwealth.
Prophets 6342 (one semester)
The latter Prophets and the Five Megiloth.
2. THE “YESHIVA” PROGRAM – the goal of this program is to produce knowledgeable Jews, who are able to learn Judaic texts on their own. The emphasis is on requiring Hebrew textual facility in the Bible and Talmud, and on decoding Rashi. This curriculum requires a serious commitment to Judaic studies and a willingness to spend time outside of the classroom in text analysis and preparation. Students in the Yeshiva track are required to take three Judaic classes plus Hebrew, consisting of one class period of Talmud/Mishna/Oral Law, one period of Bible, and one period of Prophets, Philosophy, History, Jewish Law, Ethics, and Liturgy taught alternately 2-3 days per week.
COURSE OFFERINGS
Mishna/Talmud Skills 6111 – Freshmen boys, year-long
Mishna/Talmud. Familiarization with the form, language, and logical constructs in the Mishna. Competency in Judaic style and content is stressed. Text: Orders of Moed, Zeraim, Nashim and Nezikim.
Talmud 6121 – Sophomore boys, year-long
The Logic of the Talmud. Emphasis is placed on developing textual skills and understanding hermeneutic rules of interpretation such as the analogy, the inference from minor to major, explanations from the context, deductive and inductive methods. Selected readings from the Talmud.
Talmud 6141 – Junior boys, year-long
Civil and Criminal Law. Intensive analysis of civil and criminal law based on Talmudic law. A comparative evaluation of the standard commentaries on the Talmud such as Rashi and Tosafot. Selected readings in the Talmud. Special consideration is also given to jurisdiction in ancient Israel, the Jewish court of justice, its character, divisions and representatives.
Talmud 6151 – Senior boys, one semester
Marriage and Divorce. Intensive analysis of laws of marriage and divorce, using the commentaries of Rashi, Tosafot, Maimonides, Alfasi, and Ahser B. Yehiel.
Talmud 6131 – Senior boys, one semester
The Festivals. Intensive analysis of regulations pertaining to observance of festivals. A study in methods of interpretation and interrelation of subject matter.
Torah She-Baal-Peh 6191 – Freshmen girls, year-long
Introduction to the Oral Law emphasizing the nature and history of its transmission. Representative Text: Sugyot B-Torah Sheh-Ba-Al Peh: Ben Adom ben-Chavero, Chelek Aleph, Chelek Bais, published by Bruriah Yeshiva High School for Girls.
Torah She-Baal-Peh 6192 – Sophomore girls, year-long
The Oral Law, focusing on prayer and the halacha. Representative topics include the obligation of women to pray, the recital of Kaddish by women, and women’s minyanim. Selected readings.
Torah She-Baal-Peh 6193 – Junior girls, year-long
The Oral Law, focusing on laws related to the interface of Jewish and secular society. Representative topics include the obligation to abide by the law of the land, how Jews should regard secular holidays, secular names, and following Gentile customs.
Torah She-Baal-Peh 6194 – Senior girls, year-long
The Oral Law, stressing laws of the Sabbath and laws pertaining to honoring parents. Representative topics include cooking and preparing food on the Sabbath, and dilemmas in honoring parents in contemporary social conditions.
BIBLE – boys and girls sections
Bible 6241 (one semester)
The Book of Numbers. A detailed analysis of the wanderings of the Jews in the wilderness of Sinai and their ethical import.
Bible 6251 (one semester)
The Book of Deuteronomy. A summary of Torah law as gleaned from this last book of the Pentateuch, and a stylistic and theological analysis of Moses’ last words to the people Israel.
Bible 6211 (year-long)
The Book of Genesis. An intensive study of the Book of Genesis together with classical Jewish commentaries. Textual skills are stressed. Central topics covered include the Torah view of evolution, the nature of marriage, the mission of the patriarchs and matriarchs.
Bible 6221 (year-long)
The Book of Exodus. Emphasis is placed on the contrasting trends of slavery and freedom and a thorough discussion of what took place at Sinai. The definition of miracles is also considered.
Bible 6231 (year-long)
The Book of Leviticus. An in-depth study of the priesthood and the nature of holiness.
Bible 6261 (offered periodically based upon administrative discretion)
Selected Topics. An analysis of issues in the Five Books of the Torah.
PROPHETS, JEWISH LAW, PHILOSOPHY, HISTORY, ETHICS and LITURGY
Prophets 6321 (one semester)
The Early Prophets. An in-depth study of the Early Prophets and their historical setting through the eyes of Shmuel HaNavi.
Prophets 6331 (one semester)
Kings. A historical overview of the first commonwealth.
JEWISH LAW
Jewish Law 6411 (one semester)
Laws and Customs Overview. Text: Living Torah in America by Maurice Lamm, To Be A Jew by Chaim Donin.
Jewish Law 6451 (one semester)
The 613 Mitzvot. Text: The Mitzvot by Abraham Chill.
Jewish Law 6461 (one semester)
Book of the Commandments. A comprehensive overview of all laws (mitzvot) in the Bible.
Jewish Law 6421 (one semester)
Jewish Law Survey. Overview of Jewish law pertaining to daily practices (blessings, general conduct, dietary laws, and prayers). Texts include Kitzur Shulchan Aruch of Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried, Shulchan Aruch of Rabbi Yosef Karo, Laws of Shabbat by Rabbi Shimon Eider, Mishna Berura by Rabbi Yisroel Mayer Kagan.
Jewish Law 6431 (one semester)
Applied Jewish Law. Modern applications of Jewish law in the area of Sabbath and Holidays, from selected portions of Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim, with commentary of the Mishna Berura and Shmiras Shabbos K’hilchaso by Rabbi Y. Neuwirth.
Jewish Law 6441 (one semester)
The Minor Festivals. Laws pertaining to minor festivals of Chanukah and Purim, Fast Days, the Three Weeks, mourning for the Temple, and laws pertaining to the Land of Israel. Special units deal with honoring parents, relationships between Jews and their fellowmen, birth, circumcision, bar/bat mitzvah, pidyon ha-ben, death, and mourning.
Jewish Philosophy 6631 (one semester)
Trends in Jewish Philosophy. An analytic study of the various schools of Jewish thought from Biblical times to the present. The goal of the course is to transmit a first-hand knowledge of the basic writings of major Jewish thinkers and to develop a critical appreciation of their thoughts and ideologies. Representative thinkers included are Philo, Saadia, ibn Gabirol, Bahya ibn Pakuda, Judah Halaevi, Maimonides, S.R. Hirsch, the Vilna Gaon, J.B. Soloveitchik.
Jewish Philosophy 6641 (one semester)
Maimonides. An in-depth study of his philosophical and legal writings with emphasis on the Mishne Torah.
JEWISH HISTORY
Jewish History 6531 (year-long)
A survey of Jewish History from the period of the Prophets through the Spanish Inquisition. Representative topics and personalities covered include: the period of the Judges, the first and second commonwealths, the authors of the Mishna, the development of the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmuds, the rise of Mohammedanism, Saadya Gaon, the Jews of Italy, the Jews of Spain, Yehudah Halevy, Maimonides, the Franco-German Center, Rashi, and Crusades, the Rishonim, the Marranos, the Spanish Inquisition.
Jewish History 6541 (year-long)
A survey of Jewish History from the Expulsion of Spanish Jewry through modern times. The expulsion of Spanish Jewry, the Mystics of Safed, the Chmielnicky massacres, Shabbtai Zvi, the rise of Chassidism, the Vilna Gaon, Emancipation in Germany, Moses Mendelsohn, emancipation in France, the Dreyfus case, the Reform movement, Rabbi S.R. Hirsch, anti-Semitism in the 19th Century, the Jews of Eastern Europe, the pogroms in Russia, the Yeshiva and Mussar movements. American Jewish History. A study of the foundation of American Jewish history. Representative topics include; the three waves of immigration, the growth of federations and the community center, the Reform movement, the Conservative movement, Orthodox Judaism, and the Baal Teshuva phenomenon.
Jewish History 6551 (one semester)
The Holocaust. An in-depth study of the causes and the events leading up to and including the destruction of European Jewry.
Jewish History 6561 (one semester)
The Rise of the State of Israel. A study of Zionism, its historical and religious roots in relation to contemporary Israel.
JEWISH ETHICS
Jewish Ethics 6721 (one semester)
Character Development. Lectures and discussion on self-improvement, human nature, and interpersonal relations are gleaned from writings such as Path of the Just and Mussar Movements.
Jewish Ethics 6731 (one semester)
Introduction to Jewish Ethics. Basic introduction to the study of ethics and character development. Moral and ethical guidance. Text: Pirke Avot and/or Irving Bunin’s Ethics from Sinai.
Jewish Ethics 6741 (one semester)
Business Ethics. A discussion of a variety of issues pertaining to modern day business such as monopoly, restraint of trade, and pricing policies.
Jewish Ethics 6751 (one semester)
Jewish Bio-Ethics. A discussion of contemporary issues touching on Jewish law and bio-ethical topics such as birth control, abortion, genetic screening and AIDS.
Jewish Ethics 6761 (one semester)
Jewish Family Living (exclusive of the sexual dimension which is covered in Taharat Ha-Mishpacha class). A consideration of the respective roles of husband and wife in Jewish marriage, care and education of children, and the development of Jewish life styles.
Jewish Ethics 6771 (one semester)
The Mussar Movement. Lectures and discussion on the Mussar (ethics) movement of Rabbi Israel Salanter.
Jewish Ethics 6781 (one semester)
Taharat Ha-Mishpacha (family purity). A discussion of attitudinal aspects of Jewish sexual life the biological dimension, the biblical origin of niddah laws, and the halachic treatment of this central institution of Torah Judaism. Students acquaint themselves with the positive values of Judaism towards family life and other related issues. These values are contrasted with those of other thought systems (e.g. monastic life vs. marital life). Halachic texts include selected chapters from the Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh Deah) as well as contemporary works such as Pardes Rimmonim and The Jewish Way in Love and Marriage.
HEBREW
Student placement in Hebrew Language classes will be based on teacher recommendation and diagnostic testing.
Hebrew 9000
In this class, students learn how to read Hebrew. It is offered through our HTL (Hebrew as a Third Language) tutorial program.
Hebrew 9100
Here students learn how to compose simple Hebrew sentences and to translate basic Hebrew vocabulary. Included is an introduction to conversational Hebrew. Text: Darkonim 1 and 2 and supplementary readings.
Hebrew 9101
The verb and its conjugation. The noun and its formation. The gender and its variations. Basic conversational skills. Texts: Darkonim 3 and 4, Yesodot Halashon, plus supplementary readings.
Hebrew 9201
Intermediate Hebrew.Conversation and composition. Texts: Ivrit Shitatit and Hayesod.
Hebrew 9301
Hebrew literature, emphasizing analysis of Modern Hebrew literature. Development of writing and speaking skills. Texts: Ma Hakesher, Ma Hapesher 1, Lashon Hatichon 1, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature by Ora Band.
Hebrew 9401
Hebrew syntax, with conversations and compositions based on selected readings. Short stories representative of such writers as Sholem Aleichem and S.Y. Agnon are included. Texts: Ma Hakesher Ma Hapesher 2, Lashon Hatichon 2, and Israeli newspapers.
Hebrew 9501
Advanced Hebrew. Special emphasis on developing fluency of speech and advanced writing skills. Selected readings including poetry and prose. Texts: Ma Hakesher Ma Hapesher 3 and Leket Le-chinuch.
3. THE “JSP” (JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM) PROGRAM – the goal of this program is to produce active, educated and committed members of the Jewish community, by emphasizing the concrete and practical in Jewish experience. This means that the Bible class, for example, does not stress translation skills, but rather the content and message ofthe text. Students in this track become familiar with issues, events, and ideas in the Torah, not necessarily with the textual material. Moreover, when dealing with Jewish law (Halacha), real-life situations are the focus of discussion. For example, instead of studying the Halachic text relating to the preparation of food on Shabbat, a Halacha laboratory (i.e. a kitchen) is employed to demonstrate the mechanics of how to prepare and heat food on Shabbat. English Halacha guides are used whenever possible.
The Torah She-Ba-al Peh component of the JSP curriculum consists of Mishna study and the introduction of issues raised in the Gemora about those Mishnayot.
Furthermore, the curriculum in this track stresses communal organization work such as work with the elderly, the physically handicapped, the ill, participating in the chevra kadisha, kashrut supervision, and fundraising through the Federation process.
Philosophic areas are dealt with on a special topics basis, focusing on fundamental Jewish values and ideals. For example, the topic of abortion is considered through the prism of Biblical sources and current responsa literature.
It is not the goal of the JSP program to provide skills for continued learning in the same way that traditional programs do. Rather it is the goal to prepare these students to function as committed lay people in the Jewish community. Students in the JSP track are required to take two Judaic classes plus Hebrew, including one period daily of Bible and one period of Jewish Law, History, Philosophy, and Ethics taught alternately on 2-3 days per week. Hebrew language is a requirement of this program.
COURSE OFFERINGS
BIBLE
Bible 6200 (year-long)
Bible Overview – An English introduction to the major characters and themes in the Pentetach. Text: The Living Torah, Aryeh Kaplan.
Bible 6210 (year-long)
The Book of Genesis. A basic vocabulary is stressed. Central topics covered include the Torah view of evolution, the nature of marriage, the mission of the patriarchs and matriarchs. Text: Linear Bible with Rashi commentary.
Bible 6220 (year-long)
The Book of Exodus. Emphasis is placed on the contrasting trends of slavery and freedom and a thorough discussion of what took place at Sinai. The definition of miracles is also considered. Text: Linear Bible with Rashi commentary.
Bible 6230 (year-long)
The Book of Leviticus. An in-depth study of the priesthood and the nature of holiness. Text: Linear Bible with Rashi commentary.
Bible 6240 (one semester)
The Book of Numbers. A detailed analysis of the wanderings of the Jews in the wilderness of Sinai and their ethical import. Text: Linear Bible with Rashi commentary.
Bible 6250 (one semester)
The Book of Deuteronomy. A summary of Torah law as gleaned from this last book of the Pentateuch, and a stylistic and theological analysis of Moses’ last words to the people Israel.
JEWISH LAW (6400), HISTORY (6500), PHILOSOPHY (6600), and ETHICS (6700)
Jewish Law 6410 (one semester) Laws and Customs Overview. Text: Living Torah in America by Maurice Lamm, To Be A Jew by Chaim Donim.
Jewish Law 6450 (one semester)
The 613 Mitzvot. Text: The Mitzvot by Abraham Chill.
Jewish Law 6470 (one semester)
The High Holiday Liturgy. Text: The Art Scroll Machzor, Days of Awe by S.Y. Agnon.
Jewish Law 6480 (one semester)
Applied Jewish Law: How to set up a kosher home; how to keep the Sabbath; how to conduct a Seder. Representative texts: The Sabbath by Dayan Grunfeld; The Radiance of Shabbos by Simcha Bunim Cohen, and The Haggadah Treasury by Nosson Scherson; From Twilight to Dawn: The Passover Haggadah by Shlomo Kahn.
Jewish Law 6640 (one semester)
Maimonides. Text: Maimonides’ Principles: Fundamentals of Jewish Faith (NSCY Publications).
Jewish Law 6700 (one semester)
Introduction to Jewish Ethics. Text: Pirke Avoth and/or Ethics From Sinai by Irving Bunim.
Jewish Law 6760 (one semester)
Jewish Family Living. (exclusive of the sexual dimension which is covered in Taharat Ha-Mishpacha class). A consideration of the respective roles of husband and wife in Jewish marriage, care and education of children, and the development of Jewish life styles. Representative texts: The Jewish Way in Love and Marriage by Maurice Lamm, A Hedge of Roses by Norman Lamm, The Magic Touch and Outside/Inside by Gila Manolson.
Jewish Law 6780 (one semester)
Taharat Ha-Mishpacha (Family purity). A discussion of attitudinal aspects of Jewish sexual life, the biological dimension the biblical origin of niddah laws, and the halachic treatment of this central institution of Torah Judaism. Students acquaint themselves with the positive values of Judaism towards family life and other related issues. These values are contrasted with those of other thought systems (e.g. monastic life vs. marital life). Halachic texts include selected chapters from the Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh Deah) as well as contemporary works such as Pardes Rimmonim by Moshe Tendler and Jewish Marriage by Reuven Bulka.
Jewish Law 6790 (one semester)
Contemporary Issues in Judaism.
Jewish Law 6740 (one semester)
Business Ethics. Text: Selected sections from the Talmud order of Nezikin, In the Market Place: Jewish Business Ethics by Meir Tamari, A Torah Guide for the Businessman and Torah Guide to Money Matters by S. Wagschal.
Jews, Judaism And Civic Responsibility (one semester)
The Washington Institute for Jewish Leadership and Values, a non-profit educational foundation advancing tikkun olam, social activism and civic engagement and grounded in Torah and Jewish values, has produced a new curriculum designed to integrate social studies and Judaic source material. The curriculum provides an historical overview of the Jewish community’s involvement in public affairs, a unit with Jewish texts dealing with civic responsibility and a series of contemporary issues which challenge students to apply the lessons of the sources to actual social and political dilemmas.
Jewish Bio-Ethics 6750
Conversion 6610 (one semester)
Text: Becoming a Jew by Maurice Lamm.
The Jewish Woman 6620 (one semester)
Text: The Jewish Woman in Law and Tradition by Michael Kaufman
How to Respond to Missionaries 6650 (one semester)
Text: The Real Messiah (NCSY publications).
HISTORY
Jewish History 6530 (year-long)
A survey of Jewish History from the period of the Prophets through the Spanish Inquisition. Representative topics and personalities covered include: the period of the Judges, the first and second commonwealths, the authors of the Mishna, the development of the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmuds, the rise of Mohammedanism, Saadya Gaon, the Jews of Italy, the Jews of Spain, Yehudah Halevy, Maimonides, the Franco-GermanCenter, Rashi, and Crusades, the Rishonim, the Marranos, the Spanish Inquisition.
Jewish History 6540 (year-long) A survey of Jewish History from the Expulsion of Spanish Jewry through modern times. The expulsion of Spanish Jewry, the Mystics of Safed, the Chmielnicky massacres. Shabbtai Zvi, the rise of Chassidism, the Vilna Gaon, Emancipation in Germany, Mose Mendelsohn, emancipation in France, the Dreyfus case, the Reform movement, Rabbi S.R. Hirsch, anti-Semitism in the 19th Century, the Jews of Eastern Europe, the pogroms in Russia, the Yeshiva and Mussar movements. American Jewish History. A study of the foundation of American Jewish history. Representative topics include: the three waves of immigration, the growth of federations and the community center, the Reform movement, the Conservative movement, Orthodox Judaism, and the Baal Teshuva phenomenon.
Jewish History 6550 (one semester)
The Holocaust. An in-depth study of the causes and the events leading up to and including the destruction of European Jewry.
JL 6570 (one semester)
The Rise of Zionism. A study of Zionism, its historical and religious roots in relation to contemporary Israel.
HEBREW
Student placement in Hebrew Language classes will be based on teacher recommendation and diagnostic testing.
Hebrew 9000
In this class, students learn how to read Hebrew. It is offered through our HTL (Hebrew as a Third Language) tutorial program.
Hebrew 9100
Here students learn how to compose simple Hebrew sentences and to translate basic Hebrew vocabulary. Included is an introduction to conversational Hebrew. Text: Darkonim 1 and 2 and supplementary readings.
Hebrew 9101
The verb and its conjugation. The noun and its formation. The gender and its variations. Basic conversational skills. Texts: Darkonim 3 and 4, Yesodot Halashon, plus supplementary readings.
Hebrew 9201
Intermediate Hebrew. Conversation and composition. Texts: Ivrit Shitatit and Ha-yesod.
Hebrew 9301
Hebrew literature, emphasizing analysis of Modern Hebrew literature. Development of writing and speaking skills. Texts: Ma Hakesher, Ma Hapesher 1, Lashon Hatichon 1, and Introduction to Hebrew Literature by Ora Band.
Hebrew 9401
Hebrew syntax, with conversations and compositions based on selected readings. Short stories representative of such writers as Sholem Aleichem and S.Y. Agnon are included. Texts: Ma Hakesher Ma Hapesher 2, Lashon Hatichon 2, and Israeli newspapers.
Hebrew 9501
Advanced Hebrew. Special emphasis on developing fluency of speech and advanced writing skills. Selected readings including poetry and prose. Texts: Ma Hakesher Ma Hapesher 3 and Leket Le-chinuch.

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